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A Critique of Pure Teaching Methods and the Case of Synthetic Phonics

Author: Andrew Davis
Abstract:

A Critique of Pure Teaching Methods and the Case of Synthetic Phonics examines how research into the effectiveness of teaching methods can and should relate to what takes place in the classroom. The discussion brings to light some important features of the way we classify teaching activities. The classifications are unlike those we use in natural science – for instance, how we classify drug dosages. This point has very important implications for what should be considered the appropriate relationships between educational research and classroom practice.

Andrew Davis applies the results of this discussion to the teaching of early reading, focussing in particular on the approach known as synthetic phonics. He provides a philosophical investigation into the nature of reading, and into the concepts that feature in approaches to teaching it, such as the idea of building words from letter sounds, the nature of words themselves and reading for meaning. He concludes with a discussion of why this matters so much, reflecting on how stories and books can be part of a child's emerging identity within the family. He explores how values of family life should be weighed against the importance of achievements in school, and argues for the claim that school reading policies of certain kinds may have a destructive impact if they are felt to trump the private interests of children and their families.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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A Holistic Approach For Cultural Change: Character Education for Ages 13-15

Author: Marc Levitt
Abstract: Marc Levitt's A Holistic Approach for Cultural Change: Character Education for Ages 13-15 asks educators to consider how our contemporary curriculum and pedagogy supports isolation and competition, rather than our goals for school culture change. Mr. Levitt explores themes such as 'vengeance,' 'prejudice,' 'communications in relationships,' 'trapping oneself in past behaviors,' 'respecting one's heritage,' and 'learning to embrace one's own story' through his original stories. Suggestions for curriculum and pedagogical changes follow, helping educators share the larger personal and social implications of Mr. Levitt’s stories, while teaching and demonstrating how we are ‘All in it Together’. A Holistic Approach for School-Based Culture Change: Character Education for Ages 13-15helps educators build a caring and socially intelligent community of students in a way that is neither 'preachy' nor condescending, acknowledging and encouraging our ‘mutuality of interests.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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A Literature of Questions: Nonfiction for the Critical Child

Author: Joe Sutliff Sanders
Abstract: The first book to theorize children’s nonfiction from a literary perspective, A Literature of Questions explains how the genre speaks in unique ways to its young readers, inviting them to the project of understanding. It lays out a series of techniques for analysis, then applies and nuances through extensive close readings and case studies of books from the past half century.
Publisher: U
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Agency, Structure and the NEET Policy Problem: The Experiences of Young People

Author: Ian Thurlby-Campbell
Author: Leslie Bell
Abstract:

For many years, government policy has associated young people 'being NEET' (Not in Education, Employment or Training) with educational underachievement, worklessness, generational poverty, poor health, antisocial behaviour, and reduced life expectancies. Researchers and policymakers continue to debate whether young people become NEET as a result of their own choices (i.e. their personal agency), or as a result of external factors (i.e. social, political and economic structures). Most recognise that the truth is somewhere between the two, but a clear understanding of how each interacts in causing young people to become NEET has so far been elusive, making the development of effective policy and practice problematic. Agency, Structure and the NEET Policy Problem makes headway against this problem through an original approach that draws on social cognitive theory and the lived experiences of young people themselves.

Investigating the lives of NEET young people between the ages of 17-21 in London, this book elucidates the interactions between agency and structure that lead to them becoming NEET, and in doing so, offers a new perspective on the phenomenon. It offers a valuable critique of existing policy, providing both breadth and detail on the factors affecting the trajectories of young people in their transitions to continued education, training, or employment. It offers a way forward for all who are interested in developing, supporting and implementing a revitalised approach to NEET policy and practice, and a framework around which a coherent multidisciplinary approach to addressing NEET could be developed.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Ambitious Science Teaching

Author: Mark Windschitl
Author: Jessica Thompson
Author: Melissa Braaten
Abstract: Ambitious Science Teaching outlines a powerful framework for science teaching to ensure that instruction is rigorous and equitable for students from all backgrounds. The practices presented in the book are being used in schools and districts that seek to improve science teaching at scale, and a wide range of science subjects and grade levels are represented.
 
The book is organized around four sets of core teaching practices: planning for engagement with big ideas; eliciting student thinking; supporting changes in students’ thinking; and drawing together evidence-based explanations. Discussion of each practice includes tools and routines that teachers can use to support students’ participation, transcripts of actual student-teacher dialogue and descriptions of teachers’ thinking as it unfolds, and examples of student work. The book also provides explicit guidance for “opportunity to learn” strategies that can help scaffold the participation of diverse students.
 
Since the success of these practices depends so heavily on discourse among students, Ambitious Science Teaching includes chapters on productive classroom talk. Science-specific skills such as modeling and scientific argument are also covered.
 
Drawing on the emerging research on core teaching practices and their extensive work with preservice and in-service teachers, Ambitious Science Teaching presents a coherent and aligned set of resources for educators striving to meet the considerable challenges that have been set for them.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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American Public Education and the Responsibility of its Citizens: Supporting Democracy in the Age of Accountability

Author: Sarah M. Stitzlein
Abstract: American Public Education and the Responsibility of its Citizens sheds an important light on recent shifts in the link between education and citizenship, helping readers to understand not only how schools now work, but also how citizens can take an active and influential role in shaping them. Moving from philosophical critique of these changes to practical suggestions for action, Stitzlein provides readers with the tools, habits, practices, and knowledge necessary to support public education. Further, by sharing examples of citizens and successful communities that are effectively working with their school systems, Stitzlein offers a torch of hope to sustain citizens through this difficult work in order to keep our democracy strong.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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An Alternate Pragmatism for Going Public

Author: Jim Webber
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An Alternate Pragmatism for Going Public interrogates composition’s most prominent responses to contemporary K–16 education reform. By “going public,” teachers, scholars, and administrators rightfully reassert their expertise against corporate-political standards and assessments like the Common Core, Complete College America, and the Collegiate Learning Assessment. However, author Jim Webber shows that composition’s professional imperative for self-defense only partly fulfils the broader aims of “going public,” which include fostering public participation that can assess and potentially affirm the public good of professional judgment.

Drawing on the pragmatic/democratic tradition, Webber envisions an alternate rhetoric of professionalism, one that not only reasserts compositionists’ expertise but also expands opportunities for publics to authorize this expertise. While this public inquiry and engagement may not safeguard professional standing against neoliberal reform, it reorients composition toward an equally important goal, enabling publics to gauge the adequacy of the educational standardization so often advocated by contemporary reform.

An Alternate Pragmatism for Going Public shows how public engagement can serve composition’s efforts related to “going public.”

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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An Instructor's Guide to Teaching Military Students: Simple Steps to Integrate the Military Learner into Your Classroom

Author: Suzane L. Bricker
Abstract: An Instructor’s Guide to Teaching Military Students is a resource for online and on-ground educators in private and public learning institutions around the world.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Black Mask-ulinity: A Framework for Black Masculine Caring

Editor: Lisa Bass
Abstract: Black Mask-ulinity: A Framework for Black Masculine Caring is a collection of research, narratives, essays, and conceptual works to lay the foundation for an important emerging theoretical framework: Black Masculine Caring (BMC). This framework facilitates an understanding of the teaching and leading styles of Black males, and seeks to improve the educational experiences of Black male students. This book is significant in that it builds upon feminist ethic of caring frameworks and takes readers on a journey toward understanding the ethic of caring through a masculine lens. Authors explore the experiences of caring school leaders; Black male students in need of care; Black males as caring fathers; Black males as caring spiritual leaders; and Black males as caring institutional leaders. This book is appropriate for students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in classes including the foundations of education, the sociology of education, ethics in educational leadership, teacher preparation, Black studies, and scholars seeking a deeper experience in their study of the ethics of caring.
Publisher: Peter Lang
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Bridging the Gaps: College Pathways to Career Success

Author: James E. Rosenbaum
Author: Caitlin E. Ahearn
Author: Janet E. Rosenbaum
Abstract: College-for-all has become the new American dream. Most high school students today express a desire to attend college, and 90% of on-time high school graduates enroll in higher education in the eight years following high school. Yet, degree completion rates remain low for non-traditional students—students who are older, low-income, or have poor academic achievement—even at community colleges that endeavor to serve them. What can colleges do to reduce dropouts? In Bridging the Gaps, education scholars James Rosenbaum, Caitlin Ahearn, and Janet Rosenbaum argue that when institutions focus only on bachelor’s degrees and traditional college procedures, they ignore other pathways to educational and career success. Using multiple longitudinal studies, the authors evaluate the shortcomings and successes of community colleges and investigate how these institutions can promote alternatives to BAs and traditional college procedures to increase graduation rates and improve job payoffs.
 
The authors find that sub-baccalaureate credentials—associate degrees and college certificates—can improve employment outcomes. Young adults who complete these credentials have higher employment rates, earnings, autonomy, career opportunities, and job satisfaction than those who enroll but do not complete credentials. Sub-BA credentials can be completed at community college in less time than bachelor’s degrees, making them an affordable option for many low-income students.
 
Bridging the Gaps shows that when community colleges overemphasize bachelor’s degrees, they tend to funnel resources into remedial programs, and try to get low-performing students on track for a BA. Yet, remedial programs have inconsistent success rates and can create unrealistic expectations, leading struggling students to drop out before completing any degree. The authors show that colleges can devise procedures that reduce remedial placements and help students discover unseen abilities, attain valued credentials, get good jobs, and progress on degree ladders to higher credentials.
 
To turn college-for-all into a reality, community college students must be aware of their multiple credential and career options. Bridging the Gaps shows how colleges can create new pathways for non-traditional students to achieve success in their schooling and careers.
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
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Bridging the Gaps: College Pathways to Career Success

Author: James E. Rosenbaum
Author: Caitlin E. Ahearn
Author: Janet E. Rosenbaum
Author: Adam Gamoran
Abstract: Bridging the Gaps shows that when community colleges overemphasize bachelor’s degrees, they tend to funnel resources into remedial programs, and try to get low-performing students on track for a BA. Yet, remedial programs have inconsistent success rates and can create unrealistic expectations, leading struggling students to drop out before completing any degree. The authors show that colleges can devise procedures that reduce remedial placements and help students discover unseen abilities, attain valued credentials, get good jobs, and progress on degree ladders to higher credentials.
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
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Carpetbagging America’s Public Schools: The Radical Reconstruction of Public Education

Author: Curtis J. Cardine
Abstract: Carpetbagging America's Public Schools probes the financial intrigue underlying the charter school industry. This book is a forensic accounting analysis of the financial effects of twenty years of charter schools and vouchers on the publics investment in public education. Written from an insider’s perspective by an early advocate for charter schools, the work exposes the underbelly of the radical deregulation of our public schools.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Changing the Status Quo: Courage to Challenge the Education System

Author: Scott D. Wurdinger
Abstract: Assessment, technology, and racial discrimination are three status quos that negatively impact the way educators teach and how students learn. The education system must change and courage is required to speak out against ideas and practices that do not work so we can improve learning for all students.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Charting a New Course:: Reinventing High School Classes for the New Millennium

Author: Eric E. Castro
Author: Paul Totah
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to encourage teachers and administrators to move beyond traditional course structures and to ask them to consider designing experiential curriculum that is interdisciplinary and focused on solving real world problems. Why do this? Both authors believe that the current model of education falls short in preparing students to think creatively, to work collaboratively and to engage actively as problem solvers. An educational sea-change is needed more than ever given the problems that face our world now and that threaten to worsen in the next few decades. This book is divided into sections devoted to courses that, despite their interdisciplinary nature, we categorized into the following fields: Social Science, Literature and Composition, Computer Science, Mathematics, Art, Environment and Ecology, Engineering, Public Health, and Administration.
Publisher: Information Age
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Childcare, Early Education and Social Inequality: An International Perspective (Edulife Lifelong Learning series)

Author: Hans-Peter Blossfeld
Editor: Nevena Kulic
Editor: Jan Skopek
Editor: Moris Triventi
Abstract: Recognizing that social change over recent decades has strengthened the need for early childhood education and care, this book seeks to answer what role this plays in creating and compensating for social inequalities in educational attainment. Compiling 13 cross-national and multidisciplinary empirical studies on three interrelated topics, this book explores how families from different social backgrounds decide between types of childcare, how important parental care and resources at home are for children's educational success and the consequences of early education and care for children's diverging educational destinies. Analysing a currently neglected area in sociological research, expert contributors employ the most recent country-specific longitudinal datasets in order to provide an up-to-date portrayal of the patterns and mechanisms of early educational inequality. With its extended analytical window ranging from short- to long-term educational outcomes this book will undoubtedly appeal to students and scholars in the fields of childcare, education, and social inequality. It also contains important suggestions and evidence for practitioners and policymakers trying to combat inequality in educational opportunities.
Publisher: Edulife Lifelong Learning
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Class in the Composition Classroom: Pedagogy and the Working Class

Editor: Genesea M. Carter
Editor: William H. Thelin
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Class in the Composition Classroom considers what college writing instructors should know about their working-class students—their backgrounds, experiences, identities, learning styles, and skills—in order to support them in the classroom, across campus, and beyond. In this volume, contributors explore the nuanced and complex meaning of “working class” and the particular values these college writers bring to the classroom.

The real college experiences of veterans, rural Midwesterners, and trade unionists show that what it means to be working class is not obvious or easily definable. Resisting outdated characterizations of these students as underprepared and dispensing with a one-size-fits-all pedagogical approach, contributors address how region and education impact students, explore working-class pedagogy and the ways in which it can reify social class in teaching settings, and give voice to students’ lived experiences.

As community colleges and universities seek more effective ways to serve working-class students, and as educators, parents, and politicians continue to emphasize the value of higher education for students of all financial and social backgrounds, conversations must take place among writing instructors and administrators about how best to serve and support working-class college writers. Class in the Composition Classroom will help writing instructors inside and outside the classroom prepare all their students for personal, academic, and professional communication.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Collaborative School Leadership: Managing a Group of Schools

Author: David Middlewood
Author: Ian Abbott
Author: Sue Robinson
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Collaborative School Leadership investigates how and why more collaboration is taking place in a wide range of settings in the UK, South Africa, New Zealand, China, the USA, the Seychelles, Tanzania and Greece, and considers the implications for leadership and the overall effectiveness of schools. David Middlewood, Ian Abbott and Sue Robinson explore various models of collaboration, considering their strengths, weaknesses and how they affect school leadership, including:
· executive leadership
· school-to-school collaboration
· federations
· alliances
· academy chains.

The supportive structure of each chapter, with bullet point introduction, case studies, points of reflection, further reading and summaries, guides the reader and supports learning. Drawing on research, the authors identify the key areas for consideration, addressing questions such as:
· Where does leadership reside in collaborating partnerships?
· Who exactly are the leaders?
· What impact does this leadership have on others –staff, parents, governors, learners?
· What kind of leadership development is desirable?
They look at the fact that the skills and approaches used by leaders of single schools are not automatically transferable to the leadership of several schools and propose possible ways forward for leadership and consider potential implications for education systems as a whole. They provide both an invaluable insight and also a practical guide for the school leaders of tomorrow.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Commitment and Common Sense: Leading Education Reform in Massachusetts

Author: David P. Driscoll
Abstract: Commitment and Common Sense tells the inside story of how Massachusetts became a national model for education. Twelve years after the passage of the state’s comprehensive education reform law in 1993, Bay State student scores rose to the top of “the nation’s report card” (the National Assessment of Educational Progress) in fourth- and eighth-grade reading and math—and have stayed there ever since.
 
How were state leaders able to raise student achievement to such levels and maintain them? Are there leadership lessons for others now that the spotlight on improvements in education has returned to the states under the Every Student Succeeds Act?
 
David P. Driscoll, the man put in charge of implementing the Massachusetts Education Reform Act just days after it was signed, provides answers to both questions in this provocative insider account of the key events leading up to, through, and following this pivotal period.
 
This book is full of lively anecdotes and wisdom born from experience in the trenches of education politics at local, state, and national levels. Driscoll offers unique insights for current and future education leaders interested in learning more about the keys to Massachusetts’s success and understanding of the power of state policy to effect change.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Comparative and International Education, 2nd Edition

Editor: Karen Mundy
Editor: Kathy Bickmore
Editor: Ruth Hayhoe
Abstract: With a stronger focus on the teacher's role and emerging alternative pedagogies in diverse settings, this thoroughly updated second edition draws on research by scholars from the Americas, Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. Comparative and International Education offers an overview of the history of comparative education and international development education, exploring issues related to social justice, human rights, gender equality, and Indigenous knowledge in the classroom. Appropriate for use in undergraduate and graduate education courses, this edited collection will help students better understand how globalization has impacted the classroom and led to the internationalization of schooling.
Publisher: Canadian Scholars' Press Inc.
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Competency-Based Education: A New Architecture for K-12 Schooling

Author: Rose L. Colby
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Competency-Based Education introduces educators to a new model for anytime, anywhere schooling and provides tools and curriculum resources for redesigning the traditional structures of K–12 schools.

Based on pioneering work across multiple states, the book shows how educators can design central elements of competency-based education—including performance tasks, personal learning plans, and grading systems—to meet the needs and interests of all students. Rose L. Colby provides critical tools for creating these elements in collaborative teams and engaging stakeholders such as educators, parents, and community members. The book incorporates case studies and voices from the field, and examines the variety of competency models that schools have adopted, highlighting the benefits for students.

Competency-Based Education provides a much-needed resource at a time when states, districts, and schools are working to implement competency-based models and experimenting with new accountability systems that include evidence of learning beyond standardized tests.

Publisher: H
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Computers, Cockroaches, and Ecosystems: Understanding Learning through Metaphor

Author: Kevin J. Pugh
Abstract: Of all the topics ever studied, surely one of the most compelling is human learning itself. What is the nature of the human mind? How do we understand and process new information? Where do new ideas come from? How is our very intelligence a product of society and culture? Computers, Cockroaches, and Ecosystems: Understanding Learning through Metaphor brings to light the great discoveries about human learning by illuminating key metaphors underlying the major learning perspectives. Such metaphors include, among others, the mind as computer, the mind as ecosystem, and the mind as cultural tools. These metaphors reveal the essence of different learning perspectives in a way that is accessible and engaging for teachers and students. Each metaphor is brought to life through stories ranging from the humorous to the profound. The book conveys scholarly ideas in a personal manner and will be a delight for teachers, university students, parents, business or military trainers, or anyone with an interest in learning.
Publisher: Information Age
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Cradle to Kindergarten: A New Plan to Combat Inequality

Author: Ajay Chaudry
Author: Taryn Morrissey
Author: Christina Weiland
Author: Hirokazu Yoshikawa
Abstract: The U.S. government invests less in children under the age of five than do most other developed nations. Most working families must seek private childcare, which means that children from low-income households, who would benefit most from high-quality early education, are the least likely to attend them. Existing policies, such as pre-kindergarten in some states are only partial solutions. To address these deficiencies, the authors propose to overhaul the early care system, beginning with a federal paid parental leave policy that provides both mothers and fathers with time and financial support after the birth of a child. They also advocate increased public benefits, including an expansion of the child care tax credit, and a new child care assurance program that subsidizes the cost of early care for low- and moderate-income families. They also propose that universal, high-quality early education in the states should start by age three, and a reform of the Head Start program that would include more intensive services for families living in areas of concentrated poverty and experiencing multiple adversities from the earliest point in these most disadvantaged children’s lives. They conclude with an implementation plan and contend that these reforms are attainable within a ten-year timeline.
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
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Cradle to Kindergarten: A New Plan to Combat Inequality

Author: Ajay Chaudry
Author: Taryn Morrissey
Author: Christina Weiland
Abstract: Reducing educational and economic inequalities requires that all children have robust opportunities to learn, fully develop their capacities, and have a fair shot at success. Cradle to Kindergarten presents a blueprint for fulfilling this promise by expanding access to educational and financial resources at a critical stage of child development.
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
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Creating Joyful Classrooms: A Positive Response to Testing and Accountability in the Elementary School

Author: Sarah M. Butzin
Abstract: Creating Joyful Classrooms is a practical response to the malaise in America’s schools created by high stakes testing, disrespect for the teaching profession, and resources being redirected to charter schools and private school vouchers. Classroom teachers feel helpless and students feel hapless. Joy has left the building. This book offers the antidote to return joy and passion to teaching and learning. Whether a beginning teacher or a seasoned veteran, this book shows the way back to timeless child-centered best practices that engage young children and increase academic achievement. As joyful classrooms multiply, their success will drive out the poisonous rancor of cynicism and despair to become beacons of hope for children everywhere. This book also makes the case for changing the status quo in the elementary school. The standard traditional grade school is failing to meet the needs of children growing up in the information age. Elementary schools must evolve into multi-grade, multi-dimensional safe havens that challenge children academically, while remembering to cherish childhood. Based upon the theory of invitational education, this book provides specific strategies, along with classroom management tools, to create highly engaging classrooms for young children. It also offers inspiring stories of heroic teachers who beat the odds to bring joy back to school. It’s not too late for a better tomorrow.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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Crossing Divides: Exploring Translingual Writing Pedagogies and Programs

Editor: Bruce Horner
Editor: Laura Tetreault
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Translingualism perceives the boundaries between languages as unstable and permeable; this creates a complex challenge for writing pedagogy. Writers shift actively among rhetorical strategies from multiple languages, sometimes importing lexical or discoursal tropes from one language into another to introduce an effect, solve a problem, or construct an identity. How to accommodate this reality while answering the charge to teach the conventions of one language can be a vexing problem for teachers. Crossing Divides offers diverse perspectives from leading scholars on the design and implementation of translingual writing pedagogies and programs.

The volume is divided into four parts. Part 1 outlines methods of theorizing translinguality in writing and teaching. Part 2 offers three accounts of translingual approaches to the teaching of writing in private and public colleges and universities in China, Korea, and the United States. In Part 3, contributors from four US institutions describe the challenges and strategies involved in designing and implementing a writing curriculum with a translingual approach. Finally, in Part 4, three scholars respond to the case studies and arguments of the preceding chapters and suggest ways in which writing teachers, scholars, and program administrators can develop translingual approaches within their own pedagogical settings.

Illustrated with concrete examples of teachers’ and program directors’ efforts in a variety of settings, as well as nuanced responses to these initiatives from eminent scholars of language difference in writing, Crossing Divides offers groundbreaking insight into translingual writing theory, practice, and reflection.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Cultivating a Culture of Learning: Contemplative Practices, Pedagogy, and Research in Education

Editor: Kathryn Brynes
Editor: Jane Dalton
Editor: Elizabeth Hope Dorman
Abstract: Cultivating a Culture of Learning illustrates practice from a variety of teacher education programs. Authors share their first-hand experience of cultivating a culture of learning as teacher educators. The insights and challenges are shared to stimulate conversation and engender future pedagogy and research in contemplative education.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Curriculum Windows: What Curriculum Theorists of the 1980s Can Teach Us About Schools And Society Today

Editor: Thomas S. Poetter
Editor: Kelly Waldrop
Editor: Chloe Bolyard
Editor: Vicka Bell-Robinson
Abstract: Curriculum Windows: What Curriculum Theorists of the 1980s Can Teach Us about Schools and Society Today is an effort by students of curriculum studies, along with their professor, to interpret and understand curriculum texts and theorists of the 1980s in contemporary terms. The authors explore how key books/authors from the curriculum field of the 1980s illuminate new possibilities forward for us as scholar educators today: How might the theories, practices, and ideas wrapped up in curriculum texts of the 1980s still resonate with us, allow us to see backward in time and forward in time – all at the same time? How might these figurative windows of insight, thought, ideas, fantasy, and fancy make us think differently about curriculum, teaching, learning, students, education, leadership, and schools? Further, how might they help us see more clearly, even perhaps put us on a path to correct the mistakes and missteps of intervening decades and of today? The chapter authors and editor revisit and interpret several of the most important works in the curriculum field of the 1980s. The book's Foreword is by renowned curriculum theorist William H. Schubert.
Publisher: Information Age
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Deaf Epistemologies, Identity, and Learning: A Comparative Perspective

Author: Goedele A. M. De Clerck
Abstract:        Deaf Epistemologies, Identity, and Learning argues for an inclusive approach to the intrinsic human diversity in society, education, and scholarship, and shows how emotions of hope, frustration, and humiliation contribute to the construction of identity and community. De Clerck also considers global to local dynamics in deaf identity, deaf culture, deaf education, and deaf empowerment. She presents empirical research through case studies of the emancipation processes for deaf people in Flanders (a region of Belgium), the United States (specifically, at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC), and the West African nation of Cameroon. This anthropology of deaf flourishing draws from a critical application of the empowerment paradigm in settings of daily life, research, leadership, and community work, as she explores identity and well-being through an interdisciplinary lens. This work is centered around practices of signed storytelling and posits learning as the primary access and pathway to culture, identity, values, and change. Change driven by the learning process is considered an awakening—and through this awakening, the deaf community can gain hope, empowerment, and full citizenship. In this way, deaf people are allowed to shape their histories, and the result is the elevation of all aspects of deaf lives around the world.
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
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Deep Learning in Introductory Physics: Exploratory Studies of Model-Based Reasoning

Author: Mark J. Lattery
Abstract: Deep Learning in Introductory Physics: Exploratory Studies of Model-Based Reasoning is concerned with the broad question of how students learn physics in a model?centered classroom. The diverse, creative, and sometimes unexpected ways students construct models, and deal with intellectual conflict, provide valuable insights into student learning and cast a new vision for physics teaching. This book is the first publication in several years to thoroughly address the "coherence versus fragmentation" debate in science education, and the first to advance and explore the hypothesis that deep science learning is regressive and revolutionary. Deep Learning in Introductory Physics also contributes to a growing literature on the use of history and philosophy of science to confront difficult theoretical and practical issues in science teaching, and addresses current international concern over the state of science education and appropriate standards for science teaching and learning.The book is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the framework, agenda, and educational context of the book. An initial study of student modeling raises a number of questions about the nature and goals of physics education. Part II presents the results of four exploratory case studies. These studies reproduce the results of Part I with a more diverse sample of students; under new conditions (a public debate, peer discussions, and group interviews); and with new research prompts (model?building software, bridging tasks, and elicitation strategies). Part III significantly advances the emergent themes of Parts I and II through historical analysis and a review of physics education research.
Publisher: Information Age
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Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay

Author: Doris A. Santoro
Abstract: Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay offers a timely analysis of professional dissatisfaction that challenges the common explanation of burnout. Featuring the voices of educators, the book offers concrete lessons for practitioners, school leaders, and policy makers on how to think more strategically to retain experienced teachers and make a difference in the lives of students.
 
Based on ten years of research and interviews with practitioners across the United States, the book theorizes the existence of a “moral center” that can be pivotal in guiding teacher actions and expectations on the job. Education philosopher Doris Santoro argues that demoralization offers a more precise diagnosis that is born out of ongoing value conflicts with pedagogical policies, reform mandates, and school practices. Demoralized reveals that this condition is reversible when educators are able to tap into authentic professional communities and shows that individuals can help themselves.
 
Detailed stories from veteran educators are included to illustrate the variety of contexts in which demoralization can occur. Based on these insights, Santoro offers an array of recommendations and promising strategies for how school leaders, union leaders, teacher groups, and individual practitioners can enact and support “re-moralization” by working to change the conditions leading to demoralization.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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