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People Need to Know

Author: Robert M. Lucas
Abstract: People Need to Know follows a group of students as they study the defining event in their community’s history - a 1930 lynching that was captured in one of the century’s most iconic and disturbing photographs. With ambitions of contributing to public understanding, the students set out to create a collection of online resources about the lynching. As they encounter troubling information and consider how best to present it to others, the students come to better understand the complex ethical ramifications of historical work and to more fully appreciate why their learning matters. Through the stories of these students, their teacher, and an author re-immersed in the town of his own childhood, the book develops an approach to curriculum in which students create products of value beyond the school walls. In a time of educational standardization, when assignments and assessments often fail to deliberately engage the ethically charged and locally particular contexts of students’ lives, Robert M. Lucas proposes that we see learning in their creation and appreciation of public value. The book will be of particular interest for courses in curriculum studies and in history and social studies education.
Publisher: Peter Lang
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Perspectives on Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice in Educational Leadership (National Association for Multicultural Education Series)

Editor: Ashraf Esmail
Editor: Abul Pitre
Editor: Antonette Aragon
Abstract: Perspectives on Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice in Educational Leadership provides educational leaders with practical steps for implementing multicultural education into schools. Drawing from multicultural scholars like James Bank’s it equips educational leaders with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to ensure that schools provide all students with equal educational opportunities. Concepts such culturally responsive leadership, transformative leadership, and restorative justice are discussed throughout the book.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Philosophical Reflections on Neuroscience and Education

Author: William H. Kitchen
Abstract: Philosophical Reflections on Neuroscience and Education explores conceptual and normative questions about the recent programme which aims to underpin education with neuroscientific principles. By invoking philosophical ideas such as Bennett and Hacker's mereological fallacy, Wittgenstein's the first-person/third-person asymmetry principle and the notion of irreducible/constitutive uncertainty, William H. Kitchen offers a critique of the whole-sale adoption of neuroscience to education. He explores and reviews the role that neuroscience has started to play in educational policy and practice, and whether or not such a role is founded in coherent conceptual reasoning. Kitchen critically analyses the role which neuroscience can possibly play within educational discussions, and offers paradigmatic examples of how neuroscientific approaches have already found their way into educational practice and policy documents. By invoking the philosophical work primarily of Wittgenstein, he argues against the surge of neuroscientism within educational discourse and offers to clarify and elucidate core concepts in this area which are often misunderstood.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Philosophy as Disability & Exclusion

Author: Simon Hayhoe
Abstract: Philosophy as Disability and Exclusion examines the history of ideas on arts in the education of people who are blind in England, from 1688 to 2010. This book also examines a number of the earlier influences on the enlightenment, and the international context of this topic. The two hypotheses on which this study is based are: (1) Our understanding of blindness in English intellectual culture is less to do with homologous physical characteristics. Instead it is more to do with an ethical philosophy of human capacity. (2) The arts education of people who are blind through touch tells us much about our psychology of mythologies and the intellectual construction of human thought. Furthermore, the myth that people who are blind are incapable of visual arts and have an enhanced capacity for the musical arts is one of the most engrained modern folklores. It is part of our cultural, intellectual and philosophical conscience. In the process of investigating these hypotheses, this book argues that philosophies have linked immorality, intelligence and physical ability. These have become connected in ways that are unrelated to eyesight in order to fulfill broader cultural processes of developing social theory. In this book, the process of knowledge creation is termed passive exclusion and is analyzed through an epistemological model of examining disability and exclusion.
Publisher: Information Age
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Place, Belonging and School Leadership: Researching to Make the Difference

Author: Kathryn Riley
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Place, Belonging and School Leadership offers research findings, analysis and accessible tools for further research inquiry that are designed to contribute to the development of professional learning communities. Researching about place and belonging, Kathryn Riley argues, gives new teachers powerful insights into children's experiences in the classroom and playground, and encourages them to review and change their professional practices. It provides young people with a vehicle to voice their experiences, grow their skill and talents, and develop a sense of agency.

Place, Belonging and School Leadership helps school leaders to be 'place-makers' who make 'belonging' work for pupils from many different backgrounds. It builds trust, develops the knowledge and capacities of staff, and harnesses the creative potential of young people to explore, reflect and act. Riley offers an invaluable leadership tool that strengthens school cultures and nourishes leadership throughout the school.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Place-Based Methods for Researching Schools

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Schools are complex institutions. They do not easily reveal themselves to researchers who rely on only one or two methods. Understanding a school, its neighbourhood and its students requires a researcher with a more complex repertoire of verbal, statistical and visual research strategies.

Place-Based Methods for Researching Schools shows how multiple methods can be used together to research schools, rather than dealing with decontextualised methods, one by one. Taking a novel theoretical approach to the school as a 'place', the book offers grounded illustrations of schools as places from real case study and ethnographic research conducted in both Australia and the UK. A practical guide, this book explores the on-the-ground questions researchers are likely to face in the order they are likely to face them. The chapters not only look at data generation approaches, but also address analysis of the data and writing about the school, topics that are often ignored. Methods explored for use include those drawn from urban planning and geography to explore neighbourhoods, visual surveys, mapping, classroom observation, ethnographic observation, interviews, focus groups, sociograms and linguistic corpora.

Including research tips from the authors, case studies, a glossary and annotated further reading list, this book is essential reading for students and scholars approaching their research project.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Points of Departure: Rethinking Student Source Use and Writing Studies Research Methods

Editor: Tricia Serviss
Editor: Sandra Jamieson
Abstract: Points of Departure encourages a return to empirical research about writing, presenting a wealth of transparent, reproducible studies of student sources. The volume shows how to develop methods for coding and characterizing student texts, their choice of source material, and the resources used to teach information literacy. In so doing, the volume advances our understanding of how students actually write.

The contributors offer methodologies, techniques, and suggestions for research that move beyond decontextualized guides to grapple with the messiness of research-in-process, as well as design, development, and expansion. Serviss and Jamieson’s model of RAD writing studies research is transcontextual and based on hybridized or mixed methods. Among these methods are citation context analysis, research-aloud protocols, textual and genre analysis, surveys, interviews, and focus groups, with an emphasis on process and knowledge as contingent. Chapters report on research projects at different stages and across institution types—from pilot to multi-site, from community college to research university—focusing on the methods and artifacts employed.

A rich mosaic of research about research, Points of Departure advances knowledge about student writing and serves as a guide for both new and experienced researchers in writing studies.
Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Political Transformations and Teacher Education Programs

Author: Miriam Ben-Peretz
Abstract: Chapters in this volume discuss the impact of statewide political transformation on teacher education programs.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Polling Students for School Improvement and Reform

Author: Paris S. Strom
Author: Robert D. Strom
Abstract: People generally acknowledge the superiority of adolescents in using technology tools needed for learning in the future. The purpose of this book is to describe an online polling strategy that allows adolescents to make known how they view conditions of learning at their school. A school improvement model illustrates how to combine results of student polling with stakeholders' perceptions in the scheme of school reform. Student polling differs from other strategies because the target for gathering data is a single school. This deliberately narrow base for sampling student opinion ensures poll results have local relevance that can motivate stakeholder involvement and guide their response. Over 14,000 secondary students have completed polls examined in the text. These ten polls include: career exploration, time management, selective attention and distraction, motivation for Internet learning, tutoring, peer support, cheating, frustration, cyberbullying, and school stress. Students are the stakeholders with the most to gain or lose in efforts to keep American education competitive. Accordingly, their views should be sought as part of decision making about reform. When student opinion and adult observation are considered, an intergenerational perspective can emerge that more accurately portrays institutional strengths and limitations. School principals, superintendents, and state department of education leaders are invited to consider a collaborative project with the authors. Software offers administrators rapid feedback on whole school results. Finding out how special education, gifted and talented, and second language acquisition students view their conditions of learning gives additional insight about school improvement.
Publisher: Information Age
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Potlatch as Pedagogy: Learning as Ceremony

Author: Sara Florence Davidson
Author: Robert Davidson
Abstract: In 1884, the Canadian government enacted a ban on the potlatch, the foundational ceremony of the Haida people. The tradition, which determined social structure, transmitted cultural knowledge, and redistributed wealth, was seen as a cultural impediment to the government’s aim of assimilation.  The tradition did not die, however; the knowledge of the ceremony was kept alive by the Elders through other events until the ban was lifted. In 1969, a potlatch was held. The occasion: the raising of a totem pole carved by Robert Davidson, the first the community had seen in close to 80 years.  Sara Florence Davidson, Robert’s daughter, would become an educator. Over the course of her own education, she came to see how the traditions of the Haida practiced by her father—holistic, built on relationships, practical, and continuous—could be integrated into contemporary educational practices. From this realization came the roots for this book.
Publisher: Portage & Main
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Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas

Editor: Doris A. Santoro
Editor: Lizabeth Cain
Abstract: Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas brings together senior scholars and activist teachers to explore the concept of resistance as a necessary response to mandates that conflict with their understanding of quality teaching. The book provides vivid examples of the pedagogical, professional, and democratic principles undergirding resistance, as well as the distinct perspective of each of its contributors: teachers who reflect on their acts of principled resistance; teacher educators who study teachers and support their professional growth; and historians who demonstrate that a tradition of teachers’ principled resistance has had a significant impact on American society, not only on schools and teaching. 
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Principles-Focused Evaluation: The GUIDE

Author: Michael Quinn Patton
Abstract: How can programs and organizations ensure they are adhering to core principles--and assess whether doing so is yielding desired results? From evaluation pioneer Michael Quinn Patton, this book introduces the principles-focused evaluation (P-FE) approach and demonstrates its relevance and application in a range of settings. Patton explains why principles matter for program development and evaluation and how they can serve as a rudder to navigate the uncertainties, turbulence, and emergent challenges of complex dynamic environments. In-depth exemplars illustrate how the unique GUIDE framework is used to determine whether principles provide meaningful guidance (G) and are useful (U), inspiring (I), developmentally adaptable (D), and evaluable (E). User-friendly features include rubrics, a P-FE checklist, firsthand reflections and examples from experienced P-FE practitioners, sidebars and summary tables, and end-of-chapter application exercises.
Publisher: The Guilford Press
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Professors in the Gig Economy: Unionizing Adjunct Faculty in America

Editor: Kim Tolley
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One of the most significant trends in American higher education over the last decade has been the shift in faculty employment from tenured to contingent. Now upwards of 75% of faculty jobs are non-tenure track; two decades ago that figure was 25%. One of the results of this shift―along with the related degradation of pay, benefits, and working conditions―has been a new push to unionize adjunct professors, spawning a national labor movement. Professors in the Gig Economy is the first book to address the causes, processes, and outcomes of these efforts. Bringing together essays by scholars of education, labor history, economics, religious studies, and law, all of whom have been involved with unionization at public and private colleges and universities, along with substantial research and historical context to bear on the cost and benefit questions of contingent labor on campus, this book will resonate with general readers, scholars, students, higher education professionals, and faculty interested in unionization.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English: Promising Futures

Editor: Suzanne Le Menestrel
Editor: Ruby Takanishi
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Educating dual language learners (DLLs) and English learners (ELs) effectively is a national challenge with consequences both for individuals and for American society. Despite their linguistic, cognitive, and social potential, many ELs—who account for more than 9 percent of enrollment in grades K-12 in U.S. schools—are struggling to meet the requirements for academic success, and their prospects for success in postsecondary education and in the workforce are jeopardized as a result.

Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English: Promising Futuresexamines how evidence based on research relevant to the development of DLLs/ELs from birth to age 21 can inform education and health policies and related practices that can result in better educational outcomes. This report makes recommendations for policy, practice, and research and data collection focused on addressing the challenges in caring for and educating DLLs/ELs from birth to grade 12.

Publisher: National Academies Press
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Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention for Ethnic Minority Children: Evidence-Based Approaches

Editor: Scott L. Graves
Editor: Jamilia J. Blake
Abstract: This invaluable book is a comprehensive resource for psychologists and counselors who assess and intervene with ethnic minority children. Beginning with an historical tour of psychoeducational assessment related to ethnic minorities, the book situates basic areas of assessment such as neuropsychology, social/emotional assessment, and early childhood development assessment within an ethnic minority context. It then offers evidenced-based strategies for improving the educational performance and well-being of ethnically diverse students.
Publisher: American Psychological Association
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Quality in Undergraduate Education: How Powerful Knowledge Disrupts Inequality

Author: Monica McClean
Author: Andrea Abbas
Author: Paul Ashwin
Abstract: Globally, the appetite for higher education is great, but what do students and societies gain? Quality in Undergraduate Education foregrounds the importance of knowledge acquisition at university. Many argue that university education is no longer a public good due to the costs incurred by students who are then motivated by the promise of lucrative employment rather than by studying a discipline for its own sake. McLean, Abbas and Ashwin, however, reveal a more complex picture and offer a way of thinking about good quality university education for all. Drawing on a study which focused on four sociology-related social science UK university departments of different reputation, the book shows that students value sociological knowledge because it gives them a framework to think about and act on understanding how individuals and society interact. Further, the authors discuss how what was learned from the study about how policy, curriculum and pedagogy might preserve and strengthen the personal and social gains of social science undergraduate education.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Queering Education in the Deep South

Editor: Kamden K. Strunk
Abstract: This volume explores education in the Deep South, with a focus on LGBTQ students and educators, and on queer theoretical perspectives in education. The topics in this volume include teaching LGBTQ issues and queer studies in the Deep South, educational policy and practice in the Deep South as related to queer issues, and efforts to introduce queer literature to libraries and queer collections to archives. Authors in this volume examine what realities exist in education in the U.S. South currently, and what possibilities might be imagined in the future.
Publisher: Information Age
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Questioning the classroom: Perspectives on Canadian education

Author: Dianne Gereluk
Author: Christopher Martin
Author: Trevor Norris
Author: Bruce Maxwell
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Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Reclaiming Accountability in Teacher Education

Author: Marilyn Cochran-Smith
Abstract: Teacher accountability has been a major strategy for “fixing” education for the last 2 decades. In this book, Cochran-Smith and her research team argue that it is time for teacher educators to reclaim accountability by adopting a new approach that features intelligent professional responsibility, challenges the structures and processes that reproduce inequity, and sustains multi-layered collaboration with diverse communities. The authors analyze and critique major accountability initiatives, including Department of Education regulations, CAEP accreditation procedures, NCTQ teacher preparation reviews, and edTPA, and expose the lack of evidence behind these policies, as well as the negative impact they are having on teacher education. However, the book does not conclude that accountability is the wrong direction for the next generation of teacher education. Instead, the authors offer a clear and achievable vision of accountability for teacher education based on a commitment to equity and democracy.
Publisher: Teachers College Press
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Reclaiming Accountability: Improving Writing Programs through Accreditation and Large-Scale Assessments

Editor: Wendy Sharer
Editor: Tracy Ann Morse
Editor: Michelle F. Eble
Editor: William P. Banks
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Reclaiming Accountability brings together a series of critical case studies of writing programs that have planned, implemented, and/or assessed the impact of large-scale accreditation-supported initiatives. The book reimagines accreditation as a way to leverage institutional or programmatic change.

Contributions to the volume are divided into three parts. Part 1 considers how specialists in composition and rhetoric can work most productively with accrediting bodies to design assessments and initiatives that meet requirements while also helping those agencies to better understand how writing develops and how it can most effectively be assessed. Parts 2 and 3 present case studies of how institutions have used ongoing accreditation and assessment imperatives to meet student learning needs through programmatic changes and faculty development. They provide concrete examples of productive curricular (part 2) and instructional (part 3) changes that can follow from accreditation mandates while providing guidance for navigating challenges and pitfalls that WPAs may encounter within shifting and often volatile local, regional, and national contexts.

In addition to providing examples of how others in the profession might approach such work, Reclaiming Accountability addresses assessment requirements beyond those in the writing program itself. It will be of interest to department heads, administrators, writing program directors, and those involved with writing teacher education, among others.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Reengineering the University: How to Be Mission Centered, Market Smart, and Margin Conscious

Author: William F. Massy
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Higher education expert William F. Massy’s decades as a professor, senior university officer, and consultant have left him with a passionate belief in the need for reform in America’s traditional universities. In Reengineering the University, he addresses widespread concerns that higher education’s costs are too high, learning falls short of objectives, disruptive technology and education models are mounting serious challenges to traditional institutions, and administrators and faculty are too often unwilling or unable to change.

An expert microeconomist, Massy approaches the challenge of reform in a genuinely new way by applying rigorous economic principles, informed by financial data and other evidence, to explain the forces at work on universities and the flaws in the academic business model. Ultimately, he argues that computer models that draw on data from college transaction systems can help both administrators and faculty address problems of educational performance and cost analysis, manage the complexity of planning and budgeting systems, and monitor the progress of reform in nonintrusive and constructive ways.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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Religion and Education: Comparative and international perspectives

Editor: Malini Sivasubramaniam
Editor: Ruth Hayhoe
Abstract: The contributors to this volume each demonstrate that, while religion in education can contribute to understanding and respect, it is also a space that can be contested and co-opted. Without addressing the salience of religion, however, it will not be possible to foster peace and combat discrimination and prejudice. This book will be of interest to researchers, scholars and students in the field of comparative education and development, religious studies, theology and teacher development and training. This book may also be of interest to national and international policy makers. There are also numerous faith-based organisations, as well as other non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working on religion and education issues that may find these case studies a useful resource.
Publisher: Symposium Books
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Research Design: Quantitative, Qualitative, Mixed Methods, Arts-Based, and Community-Based Participatory Research Approaches 1st Edition

Author: Patricia Leavy
Abstract: This user-friendly book provides a step-by-step guide to using the five major approaches to research design: quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods, arts-based, and community-based participatory research. Chapters on each approach follow a unique format--they present a template for a research proposal and explain in detail how to conceptualize and fill in every section. Terminology commonly used within each approach is identified, and key moments of ethical decision making are flagged. Interdisciplinary research examples draw on current events and social justice topics. Unique coverage includes hot topics: replication studies and data sharing, tailoring proposals to different audiences, and more. The book also includes a general introduction to social research; an in-depth, practical discussion of ethics; and a chapter on how to begin a research study, from planning a topic to developing a research question via a literature review.
Publisher: The Guilford Press
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Researching Everyday Childhoods: Time, Technology and Documentation in a Digital Age

Author: Rachel Thomson
Author: Liam Berriman
Author: Sara Bragg
Abstract: How can we know about children's everyday lives in a digitally saturated world? What is it like to grow up in and through new media? What happens between the ages of 7 and 15 and does it make sense to think of maturation as mediated? These questions are explored in this innovative book, which synthesizes empirical documentation of children's everyday lives with discussions of key theoretical and methodological concepts to provide a unique guide to researching childhood and youth. Researching Everyday Childhoods begins by asking what recent 'post-empirical' and 'post-digital' frameworks can offer researchers of children and young people's lives, particularly in researching and theorising how the digital remakes childhood and youth. The key ideas of time, technology and documentation are then introduced and are woven throughout the book's chapters. Research-led, the book is informed by two state of the art empirical studies – 'Face 2 Face' and 'Curating Childhoods' – and links to a dynamic multimedia archive generated by the studies.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Resonances of El Chavo del Ocho in Latin American Childhood, Schooling, and Societies

Editor: Daniel Friedrich
Author: Erica Colmenares
Abstract: Resonances of El Chavo del Ocho in Latin American Childhood, Schooling, and Societies analyses the phenomenon of El Chavo, and its images of schooling and childhood, Latin American-ness, class and experience. With contributions from scholars emerging from or based in countries including Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia and the US, the book combines reflections from a variety of international perspectives without attempting to compare or reach consensus on any ultimate meaning(s) of the work. The book explores themes such as images of schooling and childhood, romantization of poverty, the prevalence of non-traditional families and the bordering cynicism towards the economic structures and inequalities which, some argue, make the show transgressive and quite uniquely Latin American. Investigating the connection between visual culture studies and transcultural curriculum studies, this innovative title provides scholars with original new insights into conceptualizing childhood, schooling and society in Latin America.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Retention and Resistance: Writing Instruction and Students Who Leave

Author: Pegeen Reichert Powell
Abstract: Retention and Resistance combines personal student narratives with a critical analysis of the current approach to retention in colleges and universities, and explores how retention can inform a revision of goals for first-year writing teachers.

Retention is a vital issue for institutions, but as these students’ stories show, leaving college is often the result of complex and idiosyncratic individual situations that make institutional efforts difficult and ultimately ineffective. An adjustment of institutional and pedagogical objectives is needed to refocus on educating as many students as possible, including those who might leave before graduation.

Much of the pedagogy, curricula, and methodologies of composition studies assume students are preparing for further academic study. Retention and Resistance argues for a new kairotic pedagogy that moves toward an emphasis on the present classroom experience and takes students’ varied experiences into account. Infusing the discourse of retention with three individual student voices, Powell explores the obligation of faculty to participate in designing an institution that educates all students, no matter where they are in their educational journey or how far that journey will go.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Rethinking Children's Spaces and Places

Author: David Blundell
Abstract: This book draws on a rich and growing academic literature concerned with the spatiality of childhood and the spaces and places in which children live, learn, work, and play. It examines changing ways of seeing space, place and environment and how these can promote rethinking about children's lives across local and global scales. In common with other texts in the “New Childhoods” series, it asks for a reappraisal of modernity's assumptions about childhood and for a move towards full participation of children and young people in matters that concern us all. Combining critical discussion of theory with examples drawn from research, Rethinking Children's Spaces and Places offers readers a language to facilitate rethinking and catalyse active responses to the challenges of 21st-century childhoods.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Rewiring Education: How Technology Can Unlock Every Student’s Potential

Author: John D. Couch
Abstract: In Rewiring Education, Couch shares the professional lessons he's learned during his 50-plus years in education and technology. He takes us behind Apple's major research study, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT), and its follow-up (ACOT 2), highlighting the powerful effects of the Challenge-Based Learning framework. Going beyond Apple's walls, he also introduces us to some of the most extraordinary parents, educators, and entrepreneurs from around the world who have ignored the failed promises of memorization and, instead, utilize new science-backed methods and technologies that benefit all children, from those who struggle to honor students.
Publisher: BenBella Books
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Safe Is Not Enough: Better Schools for LGBTQ Students

Author: Michael Sadowski
Abstract: Safe Is Not Enough illustrates how educators can support the positive development of LGBTQ students in a comprehensive way so as to create truly inclusive school communities. Using examples from classrooms, schools, and districts across the country, Michael Sadowski identifies emerging practices such as creating an LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum; fostering a whole-school climate that is supportive of LGBTQ students; providing adults who can act as mentors and role models; and initiating effective family and community outreach programs.
 
While progress on LGBTQ issues in schools remains slow, in many parts of the country schools have begun making strides toward becoming safer, more welcoming places for LGBTQ students. Schools typically achieve this by revising antibullying policies and establishing GSAs (gay-straight student alliances). But it takes more than a deficit-based approach for schools to become places where LGBTQ students can fulfill their potential. In Safe Is Not Enough, Michael Sadowski highlights how educators can make their schools more supportive of LGBTQ students’ positive development and academic success.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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School Safety and Violence Prevention: Science, Practice, Policy

Editor: Matthew J. Mayer
Editor: Shane R. Jimerson
Abstract: This timely book presents a data‑driven approach to preventing and responding to school violence. As school violence receives increasing attention across the nation, the application of scientific knowledge is critical. For maximum effectiveness, transdisciplinary teams should use school data, logic models, and theories of change to design, implement, and evaluate interventions. Collaboration among key stakeholders is also necessary to address both structural and systemic barriers to success with violence prevention.
Publisher: American Psychological Association
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