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Reclaiming Accountability: Improving Writing Programs through Accreditation and Large-Scale Assessments

Editor: Wendy Sharer
Editor: Tracy Ann Morse
Editor: Michelle F. Eble
Editor: William P. Banks
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Reclaiming Accountability brings together a series of critical case studies of writing programs that have planned, implemented, and/or assessed the impact of large-scale accreditation-supported initiatives. The book reimagines accreditation as a way to leverage institutional or programmatic change.

Contributions to the volume are divided into three parts. Part 1 considers how specialists in composition and rhetoric can work most productively with accrediting bodies to design assessments and initiatives that meet requirements while also helping those agencies to better understand how writing develops and how it can most effectively be assessed. Parts 2 and 3 present case studies of how institutions have used ongoing accreditation and assessment imperatives to meet student learning needs through programmatic changes and faculty development. They provide concrete examples of productive curricular (part 2) and instructional (part 3) changes that can follow from accreditation mandates while providing guidance for navigating challenges and pitfalls that WPAs may encounter within shifting and often volatile local, regional, and national contexts.

In addition to providing examples of how others in the profession might approach such work, Reclaiming Accountability addresses assessment requirements beyond those in the writing program itself. It will be of interest to department heads, administrators, writing program directors, and those involved with writing teacher education, among others.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Reengineering the University: How to Be Mission Centered, Market Smart, and Margin Conscious

Author: William F. Massy
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Higher education expert William F. Massy’s decades as a professor, senior university officer, and consultant have left him with a passionate belief in the need for reform in America’s traditional universities. In Reengineering the University, he addresses widespread concerns that higher education’s costs are too high, learning falls short of objectives, disruptive technology and education models are mounting serious challenges to traditional institutions, and administrators and faculty are too often unwilling or unable to change.

An expert microeconomist, Massy approaches the challenge of reform in a genuinely new way by applying rigorous economic principles, informed by financial data and other evidence, to explain the forces at work on universities and the flaws in the academic business model. Ultimately, he argues that computer models that draw on data from college transaction systems can help both administrators and faculty address problems of educational performance and cost analysis, manage the complexity of planning and budgeting systems, and monitor the progress of reform in nonintrusive and constructive ways.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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Religion and Education: Comparative and international perspectives

Editor: Malini Sivasubramaniam
Editor: Ruth Hayhoe
Abstract: The contributors to this volume each demonstrate that, while religion in education can contribute to understanding and respect, it is also a space that can be contested and co-opted. Without addressing the salience of religion, however, it will not be possible to foster peace and combat discrimination and prejudice. This book will be of interest to researchers, scholars and students in the field of comparative education and development, religious studies, theology and teacher development and training. This book may also be of interest to national and international policy makers. There are also numerous faith-based organisations, as well as other non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working on religion and education issues that may find these case studies a useful resource.
Publisher: Symposium Books
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Research Design: Quantitative, Qualitative, Mixed Methods, Arts-Based, and Community-Based Participatory Research Approaches 1st Edition

Author: Patricia Leavy
Abstract: This user-friendly book provides a step-by-step guide to using the five major approaches to research design: quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods, arts-based, and community-based participatory research. Chapters on each approach follow a unique format--they present a template for a research proposal and explain in detail how to conceptualize and fill in every section. Terminology commonly used within each approach is identified, and key moments of ethical decision making are flagged. Interdisciplinary research examples draw on current events and social justice topics. Unique coverage includes hot topics: replication studies and data sharing, tailoring proposals to different audiences, and more. The book also includes a general introduction to social research; an in-depth, practical discussion of ethics; and a chapter on how to begin a research study, from planning a topic to developing a research question via a literature review.
Publisher: The Guilford Press
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Researching Everyday Childhoods: Time, Technology and Documentation in a Digital Age

Author: Rachel Thomson
Author: Liam Berriman
Author: Sara Bragg
Abstract: How can we know about children's everyday lives in a digitally saturated world? What is it like to grow up in and through new media? What happens between the ages of 7 and 15 and does it make sense to think of maturation as mediated? These questions are explored in this innovative book, which synthesizes empirical documentation of children's everyday lives with discussions of key theoretical and methodological concepts to provide a unique guide to researching childhood and youth. Researching Everyday Childhoods begins by asking what recent 'post-empirical' and 'post-digital' frameworks can offer researchers of children and young people's lives, particularly in researching and theorising how the digital remakes childhood and youth. The key ideas of time, technology and documentation are then introduced and are woven throughout the book's chapters. Research-led, the book is informed by two state of the art empirical studies – 'Face 2 Face' and 'Curating Childhoods' – and links to a dynamic multimedia archive generated by the studies.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Resonances of El Chavo del Ocho in Latin American Childhood, Schooling, and Societies

Editor: Daniel Friedrich
Author: Erica Colmenares
Abstract: Resonances of El Chavo del Ocho in Latin American Childhood, Schooling, and Societies analyses the phenomenon of El Chavo, and its images of schooling and childhood, Latin American-ness, class and experience. With contributions from scholars emerging from or based in countries including Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia and the US, the book combines reflections from a variety of international perspectives without attempting to compare or reach consensus on any ultimate meaning(s) of the work. The book explores themes such as images of schooling and childhood, romantization of poverty, the prevalence of non-traditional families and the bordering cynicism towards the economic structures and inequalities which, some argue, make the show transgressive and quite uniquely Latin American. Investigating the connection between visual culture studies and transcultural curriculum studies, this innovative title provides scholars with original new insights into conceptualizing childhood, schooling and society in Latin America.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Retention and Resistance: Writing Instruction and Students Who Leave

Author: Pegeen Reichert Powell
Abstract: Retention and Resistance combines personal student narratives with a critical analysis of the current approach to retention in colleges and universities, and explores how retention can inform a revision of goals for first-year writing teachers.

Retention is a vital issue for institutions, but as these students’ stories show, leaving college is often the result of complex and idiosyncratic individual situations that make institutional efforts difficult and ultimately ineffective. An adjustment of institutional and pedagogical objectives is needed to refocus on educating as many students as possible, including those who might leave before graduation.

Much of the pedagogy, curricula, and methodologies of composition studies assume students are preparing for further academic study. Retention and Resistance argues for a new kairotic pedagogy that moves toward an emphasis on the present classroom experience and takes students’ varied experiences into account. Infusing the discourse of retention with three individual student voices, Powell explores the obligation of faculty to participate in designing an institution that educates all students, no matter where they are in their educational journey or how far that journey will go.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Rethinking Children's Spaces and Places

Author: David Blundell
Abstract: This book draws on a rich and growing academic literature concerned with the spatiality of childhood and the spaces and places in which children live, learn, work, and play. It examines changing ways of seeing space, place and environment and how these can promote rethinking about children's lives across local and global scales. In common with other texts in the “New Childhoods” series, it asks for a reappraisal of modernity's assumptions about childhood and for a move towards full participation of children and young people in matters that concern us all. Combining critical discussion of theory with examples drawn from research, Rethinking Children's Spaces and Places offers readers a language to facilitate rethinking and catalyse active responses to the challenges of 21st-century childhoods.
Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Rewiring Education: How Technology Can Unlock Every Student’s Potential

Author: John D. Couch
Abstract: In Rewiring Education, Couch shares the professional lessons he's learned during his 50-plus years in education and technology. He takes us behind Apple's major research study, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT), and its follow-up (ACOT 2), highlighting the powerful effects of the Challenge-Based Learning framework. Going beyond Apple's walls, he also introduces us to some of the most extraordinary parents, educators, and entrepreneurs from around the world who have ignored the failed promises of memorization and, instead, utilize new science-backed methods and technologies that benefit all children, from those who struggle to honor students.
Publisher: BenBella Books
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Safe Is Not Enough: Better Schools for LGBTQ Students

Author: Michael Sadowski
Abstract: Safe Is Not Enough illustrates how educators can support the positive development of LGBTQ students in a comprehensive way so as to create truly inclusive school communities. Using examples from classrooms, schools, and districts across the country, Michael Sadowski identifies emerging practices such as creating an LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum; fostering a whole-school climate that is supportive of LGBTQ students; providing adults who can act as mentors and role models; and initiating effective family and community outreach programs.
 
While progress on LGBTQ issues in schools remains slow, in many parts of the country schools have begun making strides toward becoming safer, more welcoming places for LGBTQ students. Schools typically achieve this by revising antibullying policies and establishing GSAs (gay-straight student alliances). But it takes more than a deficit-based approach for schools to become places where LGBTQ students can fulfill their potential. In Safe Is Not Enough, Michael Sadowski highlights how educators can make their schools more supportive of LGBTQ students’ positive development and academic success.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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School Safety and Violence Prevention: Science, Practice, Policy

Editor: Matthew J. Mayer
Editor: Shane R. Jimerson
Abstract: This timely book presents a data‑driven approach to preventing and responding to school violence. As school violence receives increasing attention across the nation, the application of scientific knowledge is critical. For maximum effectiveness, transdisciplinary teams should use school data, logic models, and theories of change to design, implement, and evaluate interventions. Collaboration among key stakeholders is also necessary to address both structural and systemic barriers to success with violence prevention.
Publisher: American Psychological Association
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Schooled in Fear: Lessons Learned about Keeping Students and Staff Safe

Author: Deborah Lynch
Abstract: The book covers school shootings, physical violence, bullying and cyber-bullying, suicide, sexual harassment and violence, teen dating violence, gang violence, intruder violence and violence against teachers and staff. In addition to discussing each type of violence using detailed case studies, each chapter details known causes and correlates of each type, legal and policy implications, a description of evidence-based models and what stakeholders can do to address each type of violence. Selecting the right evidence-based approach (or approaches), and implementing it coherently, effectively, and with the right leadership and resources, can make all the difference.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Second Language Testing for Student Evaluation and Classroom Research

Author: Greta Gorsuch
Author: Dale T. Griffee
Abstract: Second Language Testing for Student Evaluation and Classroom Research and its accompanying Student Workbook are introductory-level resources for classroom teachers of all levels of experience, and early-career graduate students in applied linguistics, TESOL, and second/foreign language teaching programs. The book gives a balance between practice and theory for student evaluation, and also aims for readers to use testing to connect to classroom research and to their own teaching. Indeed, Second Language Testing for Student Evaluation and Classroom Research aims at self-discovery and empowerment for readers, even as second language testing as a field undergoes major shifts in scope and areas of concern. Second Language Testing offer a strong basis for readers who wish to analyze and improve their own classroom tests, and for readers who wish to evaluate standardized tests they are required to use, or are thinking of using. We work with the general idea, “OK, now that I know test X has these strengths and weaknesses, what do I do?” Or, “Alright here are students’ scores, now how do I use them in my teaching?” At the same time our book provides more in-depth treatments of key testing topics for those readers who want to know “Why?” and “How?” “Why these terms?” “Why this or that analysis?” “Why does it work?” “How does it work?” “What do these numbers mean?” “How do I use them and how do I explain them to my students, my colleagues, my supervisors?” Second Language Testing for Student Evaluation and Classroom Research includes five Appendices for those readers whose interests continue into more advanced areas. Our information and observations on issues such as rater training (Appendix B) are current and discerning, and our Reference section and Glossary would be valued by any advanced testing practitioner or researcher. Second Language Testing is useful to readers at varied levels of engagement, at their choice.
Publisher: Information Age
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Self-Regulation in Learning: The Role of Language and Formative Assessment

Author: Alison L. Bailey
Author: Margaret Heritage
Abstract: In their new book, Alison L. Bailey and Margaret Heritage illustrate how to help students become more self-regulated learners—that is, to be able to monitor and take charge of their own learning when working independently and in groups. Language provides the foundation for the development of self-regulatory skills, enabling students to express themselves and negotiate interactions with others; the demands of these self-regulatory processes in turn can support the development of rich vocabulary and social language skills. The authors also emphasize the role of formative assessment as a means of supporting students in engaging in language-rich, self-regulated learning.
 
Self-Regulation in Learning shows how classrooms can be intentionally designed to support ambitious learning. Detailed vignettes from real-life classrooms illustrate the teacher’s role in helping students gradually master the processes of self-regulation, socially shared regulation, and coregulation. Each chapter also includes strategies for addressing the needs of English learners in the general education classroom.
 
Students’ capacity for self-regulation is central to the set of outcomes that compose college and career readiness: communicating and collaborating effectively, problem-solving, setting goals and following through on them, and applying knowledge in deep and rigorous ways. Self-Regulation in Learning represents an invaluable contribution to research-based classroom practice.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Service-Learning to Advance Social Justice in a Time of Radical Inequality

Editor: Alan S. Tinkler
Editor: Barri E. Tinkler
Editor: Virginia M. Jagla
Editor: Jean R. Strait
Abstract: When considering inequality, one goal for educators is to enhance critical engagement to allow learners an opportunity to participate in an inquiry process that advances democracy. Service-learning pedagogy offers an opportunity to advance engaged-learning opportunities within higher education. This is particularly important given the power dynamics that are endemic within conversations about education, including the conversations around the Common Core, charter schools, and the privatization of education. Critical inquiry is central to the ethos of service-learning pedagogy, a pedagogy that is built upon community partner participation and active reflection. Within higher education, service-learning offers an important opportunity to enhance practice within the community, allowing students to engage stakeholders and youth which is particularly important given the dramatic inequalities that are endemic in today's society.
Publisher: Information Age
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Shared Governance in Higher Education, Volume 2: New Paradigms, Evolving Perspectives

Editor: Sharon F. Cramer
Abstract: Building on the resources offered in the first volume of this series, this second volume offers governance members, leaders, and other academics valuable insights into the governance process in higher education. In a chapter drawn from his keynote address at the March 2015 SUNY Voices conference, Steven Bahls, president of Augustana College, provides a critical study of institutions of higher education. Nine additional chapters offer a thorough analysis of academic processes that are usually hidden from view, including development of a sexual assault policy, faculty review of administrators, and successful use of task forces. Contributors describe subtle considerations and compromises, which effective governance leaders can incorporate into collaborations leading to effective outcomes. Readers of this volume will better understand how to avoid pitfalls of their own, as contributors illustrate hard-earned wisdom and lessons learned. Practical insights and guidelines on leadership development, budget development involving governance leaders, and mentoring are provided. This volume will provide readers— faculty, staff, students, and administrators—with the pragmatic resources they need to recognize and resolve governance challenges on their own campuses.
Publisher: SUNY Press
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Social Justice and Educational Measurement: John Rawls, the history of testing, and the future of education

Author: Zachary Stein
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Social Justice and Educational Measurement addresses foundational concerns at the interface of standardized testing and social justice in American schools. Following John Rawls’s philosophical methods, Stein builds and justifies an ethical framework for guiding practices involving educational measurement. This framework demonstrates that educational measurement can both inhibit and ensure just educational arrangements. It also clarifies a principled distinction between efficiency-oriented testing and justice-oriented testing.

Through analysis of several historical case studies that exemplify ethical issues related to testing, this book explores and propounds speculative design principles and arguments in favour of radically democratic school reforms, which address how the future of testing might be shaped to ensure justice for all. These case studies cover the widespread use of IQ-style testing in schools during the early decades of the 20th century; the founding of the Educational Testing Service; and the recent history of test-based accountability associated with No Child Left Behind.

Social Justice and Educational Measurement will be essential reading for academics, researchers and postgraduate students in education, testing and assessment, and the philosophy of education. It will also be of interest to policymakers and educational administrators.

Publisher: Routledge
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Social Justice Education, Globalization, and Teacher Education

Editor: Lydiah Nganga
Editor: John Kambutu
Abstract: The primary purpose of this book is to serve as a resource in teacher preparation programs. It is also intended to serve as an instructional resource in P‐12 education. The book will be especially useful in methods of teaching and foundational courses both at the elementary and secondary education levels. The book contains pertinent instructional topics, units and lessons in global education and social justice themes. The secondary purpose of this book is to serve as a resource for graduate students and researchers whose interest is global and social justice education. This unique book provides for an interdisciplinary approach to teacher education. Additionally, this book is intended to create a deeper sense of relevancy to issues of curriculum in teacher education. Together, global educators and social justice educators can forge pedagogical content knowledge that bridges the gap between affirming one's own identity and maintaining unity with the whole, thus exemplifying a robust notion of social justice. Consequently, content in this book will help pre‐service teachers to gain confidence and deeper knowledge around issues of global interest, responsibilities and uncertainties associated with their role as teachers who will teach children within the intersection of local and international neighborhoods.
Publisher: Information Age
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Social Studies Teacher Education: Critical Issues and Current Perspectives

Author: Christopher Martell
Abstract: This volume examines how teacher educators are (or are not) supporting beginning and experienced social studies teachers in such turbulent times, and it offers suggestions for moving the field forward by better educating teachers to address growing local, national, and global concerns. In their chapters, authors in social studies education present research with implications for practice related to the following topics: race, gender, sexual orientation, immigration, religion, disciplinary literacy, global civics, and social justice. This book is guided by the following overarching questions: What can the research tell us about preparing and developing social studies teachers for an increasingly complex, interconnected, and rapidly changing world? How can we educate social studies teachers to “teach against the grain” (CochranSmith, 1991, 2001b), centering their work on social justice, social change, and social responsibility?
Publisher: Information Age
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Specialized Schools for High-Ability Learners: Designing and Implementing Programs in Specialized School Settings

Editor: Bronwyn MacFarlane
Abstract: Specialized Schools for High-Ability Learners focuses on educational programming offered in nontraditional, publicly approved, and private settings, with important details about how to serve high-ability learners in specialized schools and deliver schoolwide educational change. Each chapter offers a differentiated resource for educators who are interested in designing and implementing programs in specialized school settings by providing a discussion of the critical components for inclusion in a carefully planned, coherent, and quality-minded K-12 curricular sequence. This book delivers a comprehensive discussion with recommendations for the learning experiences of high-talent students in specialized schools and alternatively approved educational programs.
Publisher: Prufrock
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Stress and Coping of English Learners

Editor: Teressa Rishel
Editor: Paul Chamness Miller
Abstract: Stress and Coping of English Learners addresses the many ways that ELs face academic and socioemotional stress in the K–12 school environment, the consequences of this stress at school, how they cope with this stress, and how school personnel and families can provide support and help. While enrollment in school programs offers assistance to many ELs, it often fails to provide the socioemotional support that ELs need as they navigate the rough waters of schooling. American schooling is often not prepared and/or unwilling to help ELs as they adapt to an unfamiliar language, culture, social norms, communication techniques, and teachers' expectations. Given the proper foundation and emotional support, ELs will be positioned for greater academic success, comfort at school, and a decrease in their sense of alienation in both the school environment and at home as they try to negotiate between two cultural environments.
Publisher: Information Age
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Striving for Equity: District Leadership for Narrowing the Opportunity and Achievement Gaps

Author: Robert G. Smith
Author: David Brazer
Abstract: Based on in-depth interviews, Striving for Equity brings to light the complex and illuminating stories of thirteen longtime superintendents—all leaders of the Minority Student Achievement Network (MSAN)—who were able to make progress toward narrowing opportunity and achievement gaps in traditional school districts with diverse populations and multiple, competing agendas. Drawing on current research in organizational learning, the authors introduce a framework consistent with the systemic perspective of these superintendents to help school leaders who want to prioritize the narrowing of gaps.
 
Core chapters are devoted to discussing in detail the central strategies of these superintendents, and illustrating how each of these leaders employed them in their particular circumstances. This book reveals the multifaceted, personal nature of this work and factors that proved to be most critical to progress.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Successful School Leadership: International Perspectives

Editor: Petros Pashiardis
Editor: Olof Johansson
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Successful School Leadership identifies the characteristics, behaviours and practices of successful and effective school leaders through the adoption of a systemic view of the quality of school organizations. Edited by Petros Pashiardis and Olof Johansson, chapters explore the similarities and differences between successful and effective school leaders and across various socioeconomic contexts. Capitalizing on the experiences of the international contributor team, this book will inform the preparation and further development provided to school leaders in an era where ministries of education, universities and multinational organisations (such as the OECD) are increasingly interested in the leadership of our schools.

Systematic analyses of multi-perspective data provided from around the world and offers the readers a comprehensive picture of the key behaviours and practices central to successful and effective school leadership. An original contribution to the theoretical perspectives on the subject is derived through insights from empirical research, case studies, and bibliographical literature from the field.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Suicide Among Gifted Children and Adolescents (2nd ed.): Understanding the Suicidal Mind

Author: Tracy L. Cross
Author: Jennifer Riedl Cross
Abstract: The updated second edition of Suicide Among Gifted Children and Adolescentsexplores the suicidal behavior of students with gifts and talents. It provides the reader with a coherent picture of what suicidal behavior is; clarifies what is known and what is unknown about it; shares two major theories of suicide with explanatory power; and offers an emerging model of the suicidal behavior of students with gifts and talents. In addition, the book includes chapters offering insight into the lived experience of students with gifts and talents, and what we can do to prevent suicide among gifted students, including creating caring communities and specific counseling strategies. It also provides a list of resources available to help.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
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Systems for Instructional Improvement: Creating Coherence from the Classroom to the District Office

Author: Paul Cobb
Author: Kara Jackson
Author: Erin Henrick
Author: Thomas M. Smith
Abstract: In Systems for Instructional Improvement, Paul Cobb and his colleagues draw on their extensive research to propose a series of specific, empirically grounded recommendations that together constitute a theory of action for advancing instruction at scale. The authors outline the elements of a coherent instructional system; describe productive practices for school leaders in supporting teachers’ growth; and discuss the role of district leaders in developing school-level capacity for instructional improvement.
 
Based on the findings of an eight-year research-practice partnership with four large urban districts investigating their efforts to enhance middle school math instruction, the authors seek to bridge the gap between the literature on improving teaching and learning and the literature on policy and leadership. They look at the entire education system and make recommendations on improvement efforts with a focus on student learning and teachers’ instructional vision. In particular, the authors offer insights on the interplay among various supports for teacher learning, including pullout professional development, coaching, collaborative inquiry, the most instructionally productive uses of principals’ time, and the tensions that tend to emerge at the district level. They provide a guide for district-level leaders in organizing their work to support significant teacher learning.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Taking Control of Writing Your Thesis: A Guide to Get You to the End

Author: Kay Guccione
Author: Jerry Wellington
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Taking Control of Writing Your Thesis offers you a clear account of the how, what, why and who of working together so that you can produce, finish and submit a successful thesis. Guccione is a Thesis Coach and Thesis Mentoring Programme Designer and is currently researching the barriers to thesis completion; Wellington has supervised and examined numerous dissertations at MA and doctoral level. They draw on these experiences throughout in providing you with expert guidance for your thesis, informed by real student testimonies and with 'Points to Ponder' and a wealth of online resources to support you along the way.

Guccione and Wellington show that planning, writing and support for thesis writers is a collaborative venture but also one which you can take ownership of and manage. They show that there are ways to become more connected to what and who you need, and explore the collegial and peer-support structures that are there to be utilised. They situate the student within an educational context viewing them not as the lone researcher able or not able, skilled or unskilled, but as the navigator of the writing process. The authors draw on their experience to provide ways of thinking, and tools for empowering students to feel more in control of the practices of writing about research.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Taking It to the Streets: The Role of Scholarship in Advocacy and Advocacy in Scholarship

Editor: Laura W. Perna
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Higher education scholars often conduct research on topics about which they care deeply, but to what extent should they be advocates for reform and social change? One school of thought believes researchers should remain dispassionate and data focused; the other, that a researcher, by the very questions she asks, can help effect social change. In this book, Laura W. Perna questions how, why, and when higher education researchers should be public intellectuals and whether, armed with research, they are―and should be―a powerful force for change.

Taking It to the Streets collects essays from nationally and internationally recognized thought leaders with diverse opinions and perspectives on these issues. With the intentional inclusion of voices on different sides of this discussion, the volume offers a thought-provoking and nuanced understanding of the multifaceted connections between higher education research, advocacy, and policy.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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Teach & Thrive: Wisdom from an Urban Teacher's Career Narrative

Author: Kristina Valtierra
Abstract: Teacher burn out contributes to the epidemic of early career exit. At least half of all new K-12 teachers leave theprofession by the time they reach their fifth year of teaching. Conversely, there are urban teachers who survive burn out and thrive as career? long educators. This book results from an in-depth qualitative study that explored one 40-year veteran teacher's career narrative, analyzing how she not only survived the burn out epidemic, but also thrived as a highly effective career?long urban teacher. Part 1 of this book uses a critical socio-political lens is used to guide readers through the complexities of career thrival. Framed within the story of one new urban teacher's typical morning, the book begins with an overview of the socio?political forces that lead to urban teacher burn out. In spite of the obstacles, the more hopeful idea of urban teacher thrival is uncovered through narrative methodology. Part 2 is dedicated to the dynamic narrative of a veteran urban teacher career journey. This inspiring story is related to frameworks established in Part 1, as well as painting a picture of how public education has evolved over the last 40 years, and it's impact on the lives of teachers. Part 3 takes a deeper dive into three salient themes that permeated throughout the participant's story. First hope springs eternal is the idea that sustaining hope supported the teacher's career thrival. Next, the extended education family is the notion that familial?like relationships at school nourished her longevity. The third theme, creative autonomy, reveals that by being empowered with opportunities for curriculum development and instructional decision?making the teacher maintained her passion. This book concludes with recommendations for teachers, educational leaders and teacher educators to develop and maintain thriving teachers.
Publisher: Information Age
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Teachers Bridging Difference: Exploring Identity with Art

Author: Marit Dewhurst
Abstract: Teachers Bridging Difference describes how educators can move out of their comfort zones and practice connecting with others across differences to become culturally responsive teachers. Based on a course developed for preservice teachers, the book illustrates how educators can draw on the visual arts as a resource to explore their own identities and those of their students, and how to increase their understanding of the ways our lives intersect across sociocultural differences.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education

Editor: Pam Grossman
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In Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education, Pam Grossman and her colleagues advocate an approach to practice-based teacher education that identifies “core practices” of teaching and supports novice teachers in learning how to enact them competently. Examples of core practices include facilitating whole-class discussion, eliciting student thinking, and maintaining classroom norms. The contributors argue that teacher education needs to do more to help teachers master these professional skills, rather than simply emphasizing content knowledge.
  MoreTeaching Core Practices in Teacher Education outlines a series of pedagogies that teacher educators can use to help preservice students develop these teaching skills. Pedagogies include representations of practice (ways to show what this skill looks like and break it down into its component parts) and approximations of practice (the ways preservice teachers can try these skills out as they learn). Vignettes throughout the book illustrate how core practices can be incorporated into the teacher education curriculum.
 
The book draws on the work of a consortium of teacher educators from thirteen universities devoted to describing and enacting pedagogies to help novice teachers develop these core practices in support of ambitious and equitable instruction. Their aim is to support teacher educator learning across institutions, content domains, and grade levels. The book also addresses efforts to support teacher learning outside formal teacher education programs.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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