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Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education

Editor: Pam Grossman
Abstract:

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In Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education, Pam Grossman and her colleagues advocate an approach to practice-based teacher education that identifies “core practices” of teaching and supports novice teachers in learning how to enact them competently. Examples of core practices include facilitating whole-class discussion, eliciting student thinking, and maintaining classroom norms. The contributors argue that teacher education needs to do more to help teachers master these professional skills, rather than simply emphasizing content knowledge.
  MoreTeaching Core Practices in Teacher Education outlines a series of pedagogies that teacher educators can use to help preservice students develop these teaching skills. Pedagogies include representations of practice (ways to show what this skill looks like and break it down into its component parts) and approximations of practice (the ways preservice teachers can try these skills out as they learn). Vignettes throughout the book illustrate how core practices can be incorporated into the teacher education curriculum.
 
The book draws on the work of a consortium of teacher educators from thirteen universities devoted to describing and enacting pedagogies to help novice teachers develop these core practices in support of ambitious and equitable instruction. Their aim is to support teacher educator learning across institutions, content domains, and grade levels. The book also addresses efforts to support teacher learning outside formal teacher education programs.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching for Educational Equity: Case Studies for Professional Development and Principal Preparation (Volume 2)

Author: Jane A. Beese
Author: Jennifer L. Martin
Abstract: Teachers and school leaders are confronted by various issues pertaining to social justice every day. This volume will help school leaders to handle these issues ethically, and is intended to be used by administrators for the professional development of teachers, teacher leaders, and aspiring principals. This volume can be also be used in the higher education classroom in order to prepare current and aspiring administrators to lead for social justice. This volume utilizes the case study approach, which has been found to “sharpen problem-solving skills and to improve the ability to think and reason rigorously” (Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2013). 
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching for Purpose Preparing Students for Lives of Meaning

Author: Heather Malin
Abstract: In Teaching for Purpose, Heather Malin explores the idea of purpose as the purpose of education and shows how educators can prepare youth to live intentional, fulfilling lives. The book highlights the important role that purpose—defined as “a future-directed goal that is personally meaningful and aimed at contributing to something larger than the self”—plays in optimal youth development and in motivating students to promote the cognitive and noncognitive skills that teachers want to instill.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching Girls: How Teachers and Parents Can Reach Their Brains and Hearts

Author: Peter Kuriloff
Author: Shannon Andrus
Author: Charlotte Jacobs
Abstract: The authors review the special qualities of lessons that resonate with girls and show how they meet their developmental needs throughout adolescence. They also show how vital it is that such teaching happen within schools that help students learn about the numerous ways that gender affects girls’ development. The authors conclude by detailing how school leaders can create cultures that support this kind of great learning and teaching.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching History and the Changing Nation State: Transnational and Intranational Perspectives

Editor: Robert Guyver
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Capitalizing on the current movement in history education to nurture a set of shared methodologies and perspectives, this text looks to break down some of the obstacles to transnational understanding in history, focusing on pedagogy to embed democratic principles of inclusion, inquiry, multiple interpretations and freedom of expression.

Four themes which are influencing the broadening of history education to a globalized community of practice run throughout Teaching History and the Changing Nation State:
· pedagogy, democracy and dialogue
· the nation – politics and transnational dimensions
· landmarks with questions
· shared histories, shared commemorations and re-evaluating past denials

The contributors use the same pedagogical language in a global debate about history teaching and learning to break down barriers to search for shared histories and mutual understanding. They explore contemporary topics, including The Gallipoli Campaign in the WWI, transformative approaches to a school history curriculum and the nature of federation.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Teaching in Context: The Social Side of Education Reform

Editor: Esther Quintero
Abstract: Teaching in Context provides new evidence from a range of leading scholars showing that teachers become more effective when they work in organizations that support them in comprehensive and coordinated ways. The studies featured in the book suggest an alternative approach to enhancing teacher quality: creating conditions and school structures that facilitate the transmission and sharing of knowledge among teachers, allowing teachers to work together effectively, and capitalizing on what we know about how educators learn and improve. The studies also show how social dynamics influence the speed, depth, and success with which any new idea is implemented, and how policies enacted without adequate consideration of their impact on the social fabric of schools can produce unintended negative consequences.
 
Policies aimed at improving teaching should focus on strengthening the organization as a whole so that all teachers are likely to improve. The chapters in this book point to the need to reevaluate current policies for assessing and ensuring teacher effectiveness, and establish the foundation for a more thoughtful, research-informed approach.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching in the Age of Disinformation: Don’t Confuse Me with the Data, My Mind Is Made Up!

Author: Selma Wassermann
Abstract: Teaching in the Age of Disinformation makes a case for the importance of developing students’ intelligent habits of mind so that they become more discriminating consumers of the information that comes at them from the Internet, social media, television and the tabloid press in this “alternate truth” era. Part I sets the stage for the need for an informed citizenry, given the many and varied sources of disinformation that they are exposed to and what the implications are when they are unable to make such distinctions. Part II deals with the specifics of how teachers may develop curriculum activities that call for higher order thinking, within the many and diverse subject areas of elementary and secondary education. Hundreds of examples of curriculum activities are included, as well as suggestions for how teachers use higher order questioning strategies in classroom discussions to enable and promote student thinking. “A pleasure to read,” the book draws on the author’s long and extensive experience in teaching, writing and research with “teaching for thinking,” and offers teachers research-tested ways to incorporate the development of students’ intelligent habits of mind in their daily classroom work.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching Literacy in Urban Schools: Lessons from the Field

Editor: Barbra Purdum-Cassidy
Editor: Lakia M. Scott
Abstract: This book seeks to provide some practical insights guided by conceptual and contextual knowledge by understanding how to teach urban African American and Hispanic/Latino(a) students by discussing culturally appropriate instructional strategies that have demonstrated success among African American and Hispanic/Latino(a) students. This book will showcase successful models for teaching literacy to urban student through a discussion of topics that include: (1) increasing literacy achievement and motivation, (2) multicultural literacy practices, and (3) early and elementary literacy instruction.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America

Author: Ellen C. Carillo
Abstract: Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America shows how postsecondary teachers can engage with the phenomenon of “post-truth.” Drawing on research from the fields of educational and cognitive psychology, human development, philosophy, and education, Ellen C. Carillo demonstrates that teaching critical reading is a strategic and targeted response to the current climate.
Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Teaching Teachers: Changing Paths and Enduring Debates

Author: James W. Fraser
Author: Lauren Lefty
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Beginning in 1986, an extraordinary range of new teaching programs emerged which moved teacher education out of universities. In some school districts and charter schools, superintendents started their own teacher preparation programs. Other teacher educators designed blended programs, creating collaboration between university teacher education programs and other parts of the university.  Fraser and Lefty argue that three factors help explain this dramatic shift in how teachers are trained: an ethos that market forces were the solution to social problems; long-term dissatisfaction with the inadequacies of university-based teacher education; and the frustration of school superintendents with teachers themselves, who can seem both underprepared and too quick to challenge established policy. 

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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Technology in School Classrooms: How It Can Transform Teaching and Student Learning Today

Editor: James G. Cibulka
Editor: Bruce S. Cooper
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This book provides an excellent analysis of whether and how digital technologies can transform teaching and learning in classroom settings. The authors collectively provide a multi-dimensional perspective on how and under what conditions technology can be productively employed by teachers to more effectively meet the challenges presented by a rapidly evolving world.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Test Fairness in the New Generation of Large Scale Assessment

Editor: Robert W. Lissitz
Abstract: The new generation of tests is faced with new challenges. In the K-12 setting, the new learning targets are intended to assess higher-order thinking skills and prepare students to be ready for college and career and to keep American students competitive with their international peers. In addition, the new generation of state tests requires the use of technology in item delivery and embedding assessment in real-world, authentic, situations. It further requires accurate assessment of students at all ability levels. One of the most important questions is how to maintain test fairness in the new assessments with technology innovative items and technology delivered tests. In the traditional testing programs such as licensure and certification tests and college admission tests, test fairness has constantly been a key psychometric issue in test development and this continues to be the case with the national testing programs. As test fairness needs to be addressed throughout the whole process of test development, experts from state, admission, and licensure tests will address test fairness challenges in the new generation assessment. The book chapters clarify misconceptions of test fairness including the use of admission test results in cohort comparison, the use of international assessment results in trend evaluation, whether standardization and fairness necessarily mean uniformity when test-takers have different cultural backgrounds, and whether standardization can insure fairness. More technically, chapters also address issues related to how compromised items and test fairness are related to classification decisions, how accessibility in item development and accommodation could be mingled with technology, how to assess special populations with dyslexia, using Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition for differential item functioning detection, and differential feature functioning in automated scoring. Overall, this book addresses test fairness issues in state assessment, college admission testing, international assessment, and licensure tests. Fairness is discussed in the context of culture and special populations. Further, fairness related to performance assessment and automated scoring is a focus as well. This book provides a very good source of information related to test fairness issues in test development in the new generation of assessment where technology is highly involved.
Publisher: Information Age
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The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter

Author: Leonard S. Marcus
Abstract: A favorite childhood book can leave a lasting impression, but as adults we tend to shelve such memories. For fourteen months beginning in June 2013, more than half a million visitors to the New York Public Library viewed an exhibition about the role that children’s books play in world culture and in our lives. After the exhibition closed, attendees clamored for a catalog of The ABC of It as well as for children’s literature historian Leonard S. Marcus’s insightful, wry commentary about the objects on display. Now with this book, a collaboration between the University of Minnesota’s Kerlan Collection of Children’s Literature and Leonard Marcus, the nostalgia and vision of that exhibit can be experienced anywhere. 
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
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The ADHD Empowerment Guide: Identifying Your Child's Strengths and Unlocking Potential

Author: James W. Forgan
Author: Mary Anne Richey
Abstract: The ADHD Empowerment Guide is different from other parenting ADHD books because it helps parents identify their child's strengths to develop a specific plan to unlock their child's potential. Parents will complete two easy-to-follow questionnaires to identify their child's natural abilities, as well as determine key characteristics in their child that research has shown to help children with ADHD succeed in life. These characteristics include emotional control, integrity, grit, resiliency, resourcefulness, organization, motivation, school fit, support systems, and productive use of technology.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
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The Ambitious Elementary School: Its Conception, Design, and Implications for Educational Equality

Author: Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick
Author: Stephen W. Raudenbush
Author: Lisa Rosen
Abstract: Drawing on an in-depth study of real schools on the South Side of Chicago, Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning. They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers. Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
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The Anatomy of Achievement Gaps: Why and How American Education is Losing (but can still Win) the War on Underachievement

Author: Jaekyung Lee
Abstract: The Anatomy of Achievement Gaps offers a critical analysis of underachievement problems in American education from interdisciplinary, international, and systems perspectives. The book has several aims: to build a new model of achievement gap research and policy; to provide evidence on the state and alterability of achievement gaps; to synthesize separate lines of domestic and international achievement gap research; and to evaluate and inform American P-16 (pre-school through college) education policies.

In light of socioeconomic changes and educational paradigm shifts, Jaekyung Lee extends the scope of analysis from a K-12 to a P-16 education pipeline and from domestic racial/social groups to international groups, with focus on the case of South Korea. Through multilevel and longitudinal analyses of U.S. national and international datasets, The Anatomy of Achievement Gaps provides new evidence on the status and trends of achievement gaps, causes of these gaps, and the effects of policy interventions. In an effort to evaluate the nation's strengths and weaknesses across the P-16 education pipeline, it draws upon a wide range of educational data sources and indicators. Featuring cross-cultural perspectives beyond the U.S., Lee reframes achievement gap and educational accountability issues.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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The Branding of the American Mind: How Universities Capture, Manage, and Monetize Intellectual Property and Why It Matters

Author: Jacob H. Rooksby
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Universities generate an enormous amount of intellectual property, including copyrights, trademarks, patents, Internet domain names, and even trade secrets. Until recently, universities often ceded ownership of this property to the faculty member or student who created or discovered it in the course of their research. Increasingly, though, universities have become protective of this property, claiming it for their own use and licensing it as a revenue source instead of allowing it to remain in the public sphere. Many universities now behave like private corporations, suing to protect trademarked sports logos, patents, and name brands.

Yet how can private rights accumulation and enforcement further the public interest in higher education? What is to be gained and lost as institutions become more guarded and contentious in their orientation toward intellectual property? In this pioneering book, law professor Jacob H. Rooksby uses a mixture of qualitative, quantitative, and legal research methods to grapple with those central questions, exposing and critiquing the industry’s unquestioned and growing embrace of intellectual property from the perspective of research in law, higher education, and the social sciences.

While knowledge creation and dissemination have a long history in higher education, using intellectual property as a vehicle for rights staking and enforcement is a relatively new and, as Rooksby argues, dangerous phenomenon for the sector. The Branding of the American Mindpoints to higher education’s love affair with intellectual property itself, in all its dimensions, including newer forms that are less tied to scholarly output. The result is an unwelcome assault on the public’s interest in higher education.

Presuming no background knowledge of intellectual property, and ending with a call to action,The Branding of the American Mind explores applicable laws, legal regimes, and precedent in plain English, making the book appealing to anyone concerned for the future of higher education.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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The Colonial Past in History Textbooks: Historical and Social Psychological Perspectives

Editor: Karel Van Nieuwenhuyse
Editor: Joaquim Pires Valentum
Abstract: The approach of the book is novel and innovative in different ways. First of all, given the complexity of the research, an original interdisciplinary approach has been implemented, which brings together historians, history educators and social psychologists to examine representations of colonialism in history education in different countries around the world while drawing on different theoretical frameworks. Secondly, given the interest in the interplay between collective memory, popular historical culture, social representations, and the state of historical knowledge within academia, a diachronic approach is implemented, examining the evolving representations of the colonial past, and connecting them to developments within society at large and academia. This will allow for a deeper understanding of the processes under examination. Thirdly, studies from various corners of the world are included in the book. 
Publisher: Information Age
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The Courage to Collaborate: The Case for Labor-Management Partnerships in Education

Author: Ken Futernick
Abstract: In The Courage to Collaborate, school turnaround expert Ken Futernick makes the case that collaboration between school management and teacher unions is a necessary condition for educational improvement. The author cites evidence showing that collaboration often leads to increased trust, stronger professional relationships, better policies, better implementation of programs and, ultimately, to better outcomes for students.

Drawing on new research, his own experience, and the experience of dozens of other district and union leaders, Futernick details key features and benefits of labor-management collaboration. He also identifies and addresses several obstacles preventing its widespread adoption, including resistance to change, myths about what collaboration really means, skepticism about unions, lack of technical support, and misguided education policy.

The Courage to Collaborate recommends strategies and tactics for educators, policy makers, and others interested in embracing collaboration over confrontation. Both sides—unions and management—must make changes so that collaboration becomes the norm, rather than the exception, Futernick argues.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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The Craft of University Teaching

Author: Peter Lindsay
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Intended for professors of all academic disciplines who either enjoy teaching or wish to enjoy it more, The Craft of University Teaching is a provocative and accessible book containing practical advice gleaned from the academic literature on pedagogy. In an era of increased bureaucratic oversight, rapidly diminishing budgets, and waves of technological distraction, this volume provokes reflection on matters of pedagogy that are too often taken as settled. In so doing, it seeks to reclaim teaching as the intellectually vibrant and intrinsically rewarding endeavor that it is.

Publisher: University of Toronto Press
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The Crisis of Connection: Roots, Consequences, and Solutions

Editor: Niobe Way
Editor: Alisha Ali
Editor: Carol Gilligan
Editor: Pedro Noguera
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Since the beginning of the 21st century, people have become increasingly disconnected from themselves, each other, and the world around them. A “crisis of connection” stemming from growing alienation, social isolation, and fragmentation characterizes modern society. The signs of this “crisis of connection” are everywhere, from decreasing levels of empathy and trust, to burgeoning cases of suicide, depression and loneliness. The astronomical rise in inequality around the world has contributed to the critical nature of this moment. 

To delve into the heart of the crisis, leading researchers and practitioners draw from the science of human connection to tell a five-part story about its roots, consequences, and solutions. In doing so, they reveal how we, in modern society, have been captive to a false story about who we are as human. This false narrative that takes individualism as a universal truth, has contributed to many of the problems that we currently face. The new story now emerging from across the human sciences underscores our social and emotional capacities and needs. The science also reveals the ways in which the privileging of the self over relationships and of individual success over the common good as well as the perpetuation of dehumanizing stereotypes have led to a crisis of connection that is now widespread. Finally, the practitioners in the volume present concrete solutions that show ways we can create a more just and humane world. 

In these divisive times, The Crisis of Connection is an essential resource for bridging the political, religious, identity-based, and ideological gaps among individuals and communities. By exposing the barriers that stand in the way of our human desire to live in connection with ourselves and each other, this book illuminates concrete pathways to enhancing our awareness of our common humanity.

Publisher: NYU Press
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The Critical Advantage: Developing Critical Thinking Skills in School

Author: William T. Gormley
Abstract: In The Critical Advantage, noted scholar and early childhood expert William T. Gormley, Jr. takes a wide-ranging look at the important role of critical thinking in preparing students for college, careers, and civic life.
 
Drawing on research from psychology, philosophy, business, political science, neuroscience, and other disciplines, he offers a contemporary definition of critical thinking and its relationship to other forms of thinking, including creative thinking and problem solving. When defined broadly and taught early, he argues, critical thinking is a “potential cure for some of the biggest problems we face as a nation,” including education deficits, employment deficits, and the recent surge of partisanship in democratic politics. While there are encouraging signs—the Common Core State Standards have drawn attention to the importance of critical thinking—recent efforts have been too narrowly focused on improving textual analysis in high school. Those who might benefit the most from curricula prioritizing critical thinking, including disadvantaged students, are less likely to be represented in courses and other activities that encourage this skill.
 
Gormley argues for prioritizing critical thinking skills in PreK–12. He takes readers into innovative classrooms around the country, including schools in Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, and Virginia, and offers specific recommendations for promoting critical thinking and embedding it across the curriculum.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity

Author: Nadine Burke Harris
Abstract: Dr. Nadine Burke Harris was already known as a crusading physician delivering targeted care to vulnerable children. But it was Diego—a boy who had stopped growing after a sexual trauma—who galvanized her to dig deeper into the connections between toxic stress and the lifelong illnesses she was tracking among so many of her patients and their families. A survey of more than 17,000 adult patients’ “adverse childhood experiences,” or ACEs, like divorce, substance abuse, or neglect, had proved that the higher a person’s ACE score the worse their health—and now led Burke Harris to an astonishing breakthrough. Childhood stress changes our neural systems and lasts a lifetime. 
 
Through storytelling that delivers both scientific insight and moving stories of personal impact, Burke Harris illuminates her journey of discovery, from research labs nationwide to her own pediatric practice in San Francisco’s Bayview-Hunters Point. For anyone who has faced a difficult childhood, or who cares about the millions of children who do, the innovative and acclaimed health interventions outlined in The Deepest Well will represent vitally important hope for change. 
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
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The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA): What It Means for Schools, Systems, and States

Editor: Frederick M. Hess
Abstract: This volume provides a thematic and in-depth analysis of the central provisions of this landmark legislation, presenting a range of perspectives. The contributors—leading researchers, policy analysts, and journalists—explore the conflicts and compromises that shaped the emerging law, outline its core provisions, and trace its implications for urban districts, states, and the federal government. Complementing these descriptions are chapters presenting opposing viewpoints on the law’s merits and its ramifications for future reform efforts.
 
Enacted in December 2015, ESSA represents a major shift of the federal role in education, and its provisions touch on almost every aspect of education policy. Yet it arrived in something of a whirlwind, and scholars, advocates, and policy makers are struggling to make sense of this new act. By bringing together leading thinkers to make sense of this important law, The Every Student Succeeds Act provides a solid foundation for scholars, advocates, and policy makers as they begin to navigate a new era in education policy.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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The Family Link to Education: The Road to Personal and Professional Success

Author: Rex A. Holiday
Author: Steve Sonntag
Abstract: The Family Link to Education: The Road to Personal and Professional Success is a source of information that is current and relevant for families, educators and communities that want to provide the best possible opportunities for the up and coming generations. Beginning with the family, the book gets right at the root of how the future leaders, entrepreneurs, and educators of our local, national and worldwide communities are molded by early childhood influences. The book offers many suggestions to those who (by right or circumstance) have dibs on the earliest intellectual development of children.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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The First 100 Days in the Main Office: Transforming A School Culture

Author: Alan C. Jones
Abstract: This book presents a series of cultural situations that could occur within the first one-hundred days of a school year: responding to entrenched vocabularies and behaviors, addressing professional and instructional bad habits, enacting alternative teaching scripts, leveraging a policy blindside, redefining the goals and practices of teams, and implementing outside-the-box programs. Each cultural situation offers a new school leader the opportunity to redefine the goals, values, and practices of an entrenched school culture—the Central High way. Administrators reading the title of this book may view one hundred days as an arbitrary number picked out of administrative thin air. I argue that disrupting and replacing organizational and instructional routines is a race against time. Every school day that goes by without some sign of creative destruction is one more day that comfortable organizational and instructional routines live on in main offices and classrooms. The idea for this book originated from a question I asked a former student of mine who had just signed a contract to become the principal of a high school. We were discussing the complexities of changing a school culture when I asked the following question: “What would you do on the first day in your new office to change your school’s culture?” The response to that question described a series managerial routines that all new administrators have learned to perform as they move from the classroom to the main office: organize the office, meet staff, tour the building, write a newsletter, examine data, and visit community venues. Nothing in this conversation described strategies for redefining the beliefs and values of an entrenched school culture. With this conversation in mind, I made it a point in my formal and informal contacts with school administrators to always ask the question: “What would you do in the first day in your new office to change your school’s culture?” The most common responses involved reviewing district documents, touring facilities, meeting staff, listening to stakeholders and managing systems. In each conversation, school leaders populated their responses with the current jargon of school reform: learning communities, data mining, standards-based curriculum, differentiated learning, common core standards, formative assessment, race to the top, continuous improvement, etc. While these responses encompass reasonable behaviors on the first day in the main office, not one of these actions possesses the capacity to connect educational values expressed in school mission statements—why are we here—to daily organizational and instructional routines. Each activity gives the appearance of leading, but produces no connections between beliefs, values, and practices. Although none of these responses would make or break a school culture, they do represent a pattern of thinking and behaving that holds out little possibility of fundamentally changing a school’s culture.
Publisher: Information Age
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The Global testing culture: Shaping education policy, perceptions, and practice

Editor: William C. Smith
Abstract: The past thirty years have seen a rapid expansion of testing, exposing students worldwide to tests that are now, more than ever, standardized and linked to high-stakes outcomes. The global testing culture permeates all aspects of education, from financing, to parental involvement, to teacher and student beliefs and practices. The reinforcing nature of the global testing culture leads to an environment where testing becomes synonymous with accountability, which becomes synonymous with education quality. This book problematizes this culture by providing critical perspectives that challenge the assumptions of the culture and describe how the culture manifests in national contexts.
Publisher: Symposium Books
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The Growing OutofSchool Time Field: Past, Present, and Future

Editor: Helen Janc Malone
Editor: Tara Donahue
Abstract: Leading OST experts explore latest knowledge, intentionally bridging research and practice, and propose new areas of inquiry within each of the following six sections: OST as a vehicle for young people’s development; socio-cultural dimensions of OST; professional development within OST; research- and evaluation-informed field; OST advocacy; and future directions for the OST field. The OST field has grown considerably over the last two decades. Today, we have the frameworks, practice- and research-based knowledge and tools, and burgeoning paths to advance the field across multiple dimensions: demographic, stakeholder groups, contexts, systems and sectors, and disciplines. The hallmark of the OST field has been the ability to remain agile and adaptable to change in a way that complements the field and supports all children and young people in diverse ways. This anthology is designed to be a platform for research-practice discussions and future directions that could further grow, sustain, and improve the field. We hope this book inspires both reflections and conversations on the OST field.
Publisher: Information Age
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The Heart and Science of Teaching: Transformative Applications That Integrate Academic and Social–Emotional Learning

Author: C. Bobbi Hansen
Abstract: The Heart and Science of Teaching shows readers why and how to connect essential social–emotional factors and critical cognitive aspects of learning for all students. Incorporating the latest research demonstrating that students really cannot learn well without social–emotional connections within their learning communities, the book depicts classroom applications that link academic content and SEL with examples at all grade levels and all subject areas. Each chapter addresses current and emerging research around a particular component and shows how to make it work in real classrooms.
Publisher: Teacher's College Press
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The Hidden Link Between Vision and Learning: Why Millions of Learning-Disabled Children Are Misdiagnosed

Author: Wendy Beth Rosen
Abstract: Vision, in all its complexity, is more than meets the eye. The knowledge that lies between the covers of this book will define, with depth and clarity, what this magnificent sense actually encompasses and why it is critical to the learning process. Far beyond 20/20, vision involves more than two-dozen skills that enable us to navigate through the world. 

There are inestimable numbers of children who are struggling with learning, and compromised in ways most people are unaware of, because these little-known visual skills are not functioning properly. This can profoundly impact a child’s success in school, and in life. The symptoms of an unrecognized vision disorder can mimic other conditions, for which many children may be classified or medicated. Because of this, the potential for misdiagnosing the true cause of a child’s struggles is enormous. 

This book reveals the untold facts about the sense we rely on most and understand the least. You will come away fully informed, enriched, and equipped with answers that will shed light on why so many children are beset with stress and struggle.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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