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This Once Was Us: the life and death of Penguin Education

Author: the West Drayton Collective
Abstract: This Once Was Us is a celebration of a bold and innovative venture, Penguin Education, which shone briefly in the publishing firmament in the 1960s and 1970s, before being cruelly extinguished by its owners. It is a remembrance of things past, put together by many of those who worked for the company during its mould-breaking years spent re-inventing the schoolbook. These detailed and colourful pages bear testament to the unique style of collaboration that marked the Penguin Education way of working. They also record the widespread protests, from both inside and outside education, which emerged when the shutdown brought the pioneering work to an abrupt and untimely end.
Publisher: Symposium Books
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To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strength-Based Strategies for Helping Twice-Exceptional Students With LD, ADHD, and Other Disorders (3rd ed.)

Author: Susan Baum
Author: Robin Schader
Author: Steven Owen
Abstract: To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled is one of the most popular resources available on identifying and meeting the needs of twice-exceptional students. This updated third edition provides a comprehensive look at the complex world of students with remarkable gifts, talents, and interests, who simultaneously face learning, attention, or social challenges from LD, ADHD, ASD, and other disorders. Through case studies and years of research, the authors present a rationale for using a strength-based, talent-focused approach to meeting the needs of this special population. 
Publisher: Prufrock Press Inc.
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Tomboys and Other Gender Heroes: Confessions from the Classroom

Author: Karleen Pendleton Jiménez
Abstract: Have you ever been told that you’re too girlish or too boyish? We are all potential targets of the gender police, some more so than others. And how did you respond? Did you hide or change or rebel or hurt or gleefully celebrate your style? Tomboys and Other Gender Heroes is a study that brings together gender stories from approximately 600 children and youth. Set in both urban and rural contexts, these young people show how their schools and communities respond to their bodies, passions, and imaginations. As one 13-year-old student expresses, «My flowered jeans make me feel happy because they represent the sort of feminine side to me and at the same time show my masculine side. They also make me feel like I’m a part of a large force that stands up to bullying and criticism, to express themselves and to show the world that our lives have meaning.» In this book, student writings are framed by teaching strategies and gender theory, featuring themes of sports, film, media, landscape, joyfulness, and gender creativity. The research will be of great interest to university students in the fields of education, gender, sexuality and women’s studies, sociology, social work, psychology, counseling, and child development. This book is ideal for teachers, professors, parents, and community members who hope to create accepting environments for gender diversity.
Publisher: Peter Lang
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Transgender Children and Youth: Cultivating Pride and Joy with Families in Transition

Author: Elijah C. Nealy
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A comprehensive guide to the medical, emotional, and social issues of trans kids. These days, it is practically impossible not to hear about some aspect of transgender life. Whether it is the bathroom issue in North Carolina, trans people in the military, or on television, trans life has become front and center after years of marginalization. And kids are coming out as trans at younger and younger ages, which is a good thing for them. But what written resources are available to parents, teachers, and mental health professionals who need to support these children?

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
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Truth Without Tears: African American Women Deans Share Lessons in Leadership

Author: Carolyn R. Hodges
Author: Olga M. Welch
Author: H. Richard Milner IV
Author: Earl T. Braxton
Abstract: Truth Without Tears is a timely and insightful portrait of Black women leaders in American colleges and universities. Carolyn R. Hodges and Olga M. Welch are former deans who draw extensively on their experience as African American women to account for both the challenges and opportunities facing women of color in educational leadership positions.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Understanding Schematic Learning at Two

Author: Julie Brierley
Author: Cathy Nutbrown
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Providing a deeper understanding of how two-year-old children learn, Understanding Schematic Learning at Two highlights how a schematic pedagogy can be used to recognise and support two-year-old children's thinking and understanding of the world around them. Over a 16-week period four children's individual experiences and stories are constructed, providing detailed written and photographic evidence of the unfolding schematic learning journeys of each. Following the children from nursery setting to their home environments, readers gain a greater understanding of how, even at such a young age, children are intrinsically motivated to select resources from the environment to support their schematic pursuits. The book focuses on the importance of an appropriate environment and informed pedagogy to support two-year-old children's schematic explorations and the significant role adults play in developing these.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Unlearning to Teach Through Intercultural Professional Development (Research for Social Justice: Personal-Passionate-Participatory)

Author: Candace Schlein
Abstract: This book comprises an examination of novice teachers' experiences in schools and cultures of schooling across the contexts of Hong Kong, Japan, and Canada. Drawing on narrative inquiry and arts-based approaches, this study employs experience as a starting point for making sense of both professional and personal encounters in local and foreign settings. This work thus sheds light on how people make sense of shifting landscapes in an era of increasing intercultural communication and interaction while addressing important curricular implications of intercultural professional development for equity and social justice.
Publisher: Information Age
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Untold Narratives: African Americans Who Received Special Education Services and Succeeded Beyond Expectations

Editor: Shawn Anthony Robinson
Abstract: This edited book reflects a much needed area of scholarship as the voices of African American (AA) or Black students defined by various labels such as learning disability, blindness/visual impairment, cognitive development, speech or language impairment, and hearing impairment are rare within the scholarly literature. Students tagged with those identifiers within the Pk-20 academic system have not only been ignored, and discounted, but have also had their learning framed from a deficit perspective rather than a strength-based perspective. Moreover, it was uncommon to hear first person narratives about how AA students have understood their positions within the general education and special education systems. Therefore, with a pervasive lack of knowledge when it comes to understanding the experiences of AA with disabilities, this book describes personal experiences, and challenges the idea that AA students with disabilities are substandard. While this book will emphasize successful narratives, it will also provide counter-narratives to demystify the myth that those with disabilities cannot succeed or obtain terminal degrees. Overall, this edited book is a much needed contribution to the scholarly literature and may help teachers across a wide array of academic disciplines in meeting the academic and social needs of AA students with disabilities. 
Publisher: Information Age
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Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom: A Practical Introduction for Teachers, Lecturers, and Students

Author: Claire Battershill
Author: Shawna Ross
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Rooted in the day-to-day experience of teaching and written for those without specialist technical knowledge, this book is the first practical guide to using digital tools and resources in the humanities classroom.

Using Digital Humanities in the Classroom covers such topics as:

· Overcoming resistance to technology – your own, your colleagues' and your students'
· Finding, evaluating and using digital resources
· Designing syllabi and planning classroom activities and assignments
· Solving problems when technology goes wrong
· Using digital tools for collaborative projects, course work and theses
· Enhancing your teaching by finding support communities and connecting to your research

Taking a step-by-step approach to incorporating digital humanities tools into your teaching, the book is also supported by a companion website, including tutorials, sample classroom activity prompts and assignments, and a bibliographic essay for each book chapter.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Using Nonfiction for Civic Engagement in Classrooms: Critical Approaches

Editor: Vivian Yenika-Agbaw
Editor: Ruth McKoy Lowery
Editor: Paul H. Ricks
Abstract: This book acknowledges the existence of high quality nonfiction children’s literature that may serve as a basis for conversation about civic engagements and our roles as global citizens. It touches on our social history, and offers ideas for how educators might be able to engage readers in healthy and useful dialogues on what it means to be human and how nonfiction texts attempt to reconstruct this reality in this quest to recognize our collective humanity.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Visual Thinking Strategies for Preschool: Using Art to Enhance Literacy and Social Skills

Author: Philip Yenawine
Abstract: Visual Thinking Strategies for Preschool shows how teachers can add visual thinking strategies (VTS) to their existing curriculum to encourage language, critical thinking, and social skills for children ages three to five. In this sequel to his popular book, Visual Thinking Strategies, author Philip Yenawine describes using art and other visual experiences to create engaging and powerful learner-centered environments for young children just beginning their formal school experience. The book provides transcripts and analysis of classroom conversations as a means of illustrating the range of ways VTS can be used with preschoolers. Drawing on interviews with preschool teachers from public, private, and charter schools from around the country, Yenawine highlights the benefits of these discussions for students, including English language learners and students with special needs.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Voices of Resistance and Renewal: Indigenous Leadership in Education

Editor: Dorothy Aguilera-Black Bear
Editor: John W. Tippeconnic III
Abstract: Dedicated to the principle that leadership must come from within the communities to be led, Voices of Resistance and Renewal applies recent research on local, culture-specific learning to the challenges of education and leadership that Native people face. Bringing together both Native and non-Native scholars who have a wide range of experience in the practice and theory of indigenous education, editors Dorothy Aguilera–Black Bear and John Tippeconnic III focus on the theoretical foundations of indigenous leadership, the application of leadership theory to community contexts, and the knowledge necessary to prepare leaders for decolonizing education. Thsi volume provides a variety of philosophical principles that will guide leaders at all levels of education who seek to encourage self-determination and revitalization, and it has important implications for the future of Native leadership, education, community, and culture, and for institutions of learning that have not addressed Native populations effectively in the past.
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
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Voices of Resistance: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Chican@ Children's Literature

Editor: Laura Alamillo
Editor: Larissa M. Mercado-Lopez
Editor: Cristina Herrera
Abstract: The banning of Mexican-American Studies and censorship of Chican@-authored books in Arizona were part of a succession of anti-Mexican and anti-Chican@ policies that were enacted across the state and in the education system. The counterstories offered through these classes and literature not only created a sense of cultural inclusion, but ignited a political and activist consciousness among the mostly Chican@ youth, and reinvigorated conversations among educators about the teaching of race, ethnicity, and culture in the classroom, particularly through youth literature. While most work on youth literature has emphasized “multicultural” literature as a means of being inclusive, Voices of Resistance: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Chican@ Children’s Literature recognizes that our present moment--one that is rife with continued anti-Mexican sentiment but that has given rise to our first Chicano National Poet Laureate--demands a more focused study of children’s and young adult literature by and about Chican@s. This collection re-examines how we view multicultural and diversity literature and recognize literature that invites social transformation. Using multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives to critically examine a wide range of Chican@ children’s pictures book and young adult novels, this collection reaffirms Chicano@ children’s literature as a means to achieve equity and social change.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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When School Policies Backfire: How Well-Intended Measures Can Harm Our Most Vulnerable Students

Editor: Michael A. Gottfried
Editor: Gilberto Q. Conchas
Abstract: Like medical practitioners, educators share the moral obligation to “first, do no harm.” But as this provocative volume shows, education policies do not always live up to this ideal, especially policies intended to help our most vulnerable students. When School Policies Backfire draws our attention to education policies designed to help disadvantaged students that instead had the perverse effect of harming them by exacerbating the very problems they were intended to solve. The rigorous case studies that make up the book are contributed by a diverse group of scholars with different methodological approaches. The cases address important areas of education reform, from literacy and technology programs to school closings, school choice, and accountability policies. Each case shows how and why a particular program backfired. Taken together, they present a wide-ranging critique of the kinds of policies that compose the cornerstones of current education reform efforts.

Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Why Kids Love (and Hate) School: Reflections on Difference

Editor: Steven P. Jones
Author: Eric C. Sheffield
Abstract: This collection consists of theoretical discussions, personal reflections, research reports, and policy suggestions sourced in the experiences of our most vulnerable students with an eye to making schools places all students might love rather than hate. The essays take up these issues from the perspectives of poverty, gender, race, ethnicity, ability, language, and religion among others.
Publisher: Myers Education Press
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Why Students Disengage in American Schools and What We Can Do About It

Author: Paul Bernabei
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Engaged students with a passion for learning are becoming rare in American schools. Why do students lose their passion for learning and disengage in school?

The continual comparison and judgment that our youth experience result in their belief that they are not good enough or not smart enough. To the extent that this happens, fear diminishes their curiosity, strips away their self-confidence, and results in disengagement and unfulfilled potential. This book examines the significance of disengagement and presents strategies for overcoming it.

Publisher: TOP20 Publishing
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Why Write in Math Class?

Author: Linda Dacey
Abstract: To help students communicate their mathematical thinking, many teachers have created classrooms where math talk has become a successful and joyful instructional practice. Building on that success, the ideas in Why Write in Math Class? help students construct, explore, represent, refine, connect, and reflect on mathematical ideas. Writing also provides teachers with a window into each student’s thinking and informs instructional decisions.
Publisher: Stenhouse
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Within Reach: Providing Universal Access to the Four Pillars of Literacy

Author: Hoaihuong "Orletta" Nguyen
Author: Jeanne Sesky
Abstract: Within Reach is a text for anyone interested in improving instructional practices with their students, and in expanding those practices from classroom to classroom. The multifaceted sections of the text broaden the audiences: teacher leaders, administrators, practicing teachers, and teacher/administrator preparation programs in higher education. The content from Within Reach can be used to build systems and practices to increase instructional effectiveness to address diverse students’ learning needs. The text offers research based, effective, instructional practices and how they relate to diverse learners and Common Core, as well as to understand how to employ teacher leaders to network such practices.Within Reach is an excellent match for district and federal funding because it focuses on professional development to bridge the achievement gap, instructional accountability measures, and making connections to the Common Core. Districts can access funding through Title 1, Common Core funding initiatives, and federal grants. It can also be adopted in higher education teacher and administrator preparation programs. For example, in teacher preparation programs, Within Reach covers topics such as Teaching Multiculturalism Education, Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities, Teaching English Language Learners, and Language Acquisition and Development Certification Courses, and Teacher Leadership.
Publisher: Information Age
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Working together: A case study of a national arts education partnership

Author: Bernard W. Andrews
Abstract: Partnerships among a variety of institutions - for profit, not-for-profit, and non-profit - are a relatively recent organizational development. Such partnerships link businesses, government, and social agencies. The primary reason for these relationships is to achieve goals sooner and more efficiently by building on the resources and expertise of each partner. In arts education, schools, arts organizations, cultural institutions, government agencies, and universities have engaged in joint ventures to improve the teaching and learning of the arts disciplines in their schools and in their communities. These partnerships have been particularly beneficial for teachers, many of whom have limited background in the arts but are expected to teach them in their classrooms. Arts partnerships initially focused on the goals of the participating organizations; that is, to develop artistic skills, to build future audiences, and/or to encourage young people to consider an artistic career. More recently, partnerships focus on educational goals rather than solely artistic ones. Despite the challenges and complexities of arts education partnerships, most partners believe that the benefits to students, teachers and the community outweigh the disadvantages and consequently, as the research in Working Together demonstrates, they are willing to justify the time, energy, and expense involved to improve the quality of arts education.
Publisher: Peter Lang
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Working Toward Success: Board and Superintendent Interactions, Relationships, and Hiring Issues

Editor: Amy E. Van Deuren
Editor: Thomas F. Evert
Editor: Bette A. Lang
Abstract: Published in Partnership with the American Association of School Administrators, this book is a resource for both board members and superintendents, and explores issues related to the board/superintendent relationship and superintendent hiring practices. The book includes contributions from experienced and new superintendents and board members on a wide range of topics that boards and superintendents must navigate together successfully in order to move districts in a positive direction for students, staff, parents, and communities.

This book is unique in that the intended audience is both boards and superintendents. It is not a resource wherein “experts” tell board members how they should conduct board business, nor a resource that informs superintendents how to “manage” school boards. Instead, the book promotes and encourages a productive working relationship and partnership that moves school districts forward in a positive manner.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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WPAs in Transition: Navigating Educational Leadership Positions

Editor: Courtney Adams Wooten
Editor: Jacob Babb
Editor: Brian Ray
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WPAs in Transition shares a wide variety of professional and personal perspectives about the costs, benefits, struggles, and triumphs experienced by writing program administrators making transitions into and out of leadership positions. During such transitions, WPAs and other leaders who function as both administrators and faculty face the professional and personal challenges of redefining who they are, the work they do, and with whom they collaborate. WPAs in Transition creates a grounded and nuanced experiential understanding of what it means to navigate changing roles, advancing the dialogue around WPAs’ and other administrators’ identities, career paths, work-life balance, and location, and is a meaningful addition to the broader literature on administration and leadership.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Writing and School Reform: Writing Instruction in the Age of Common Core and Standardized Testing

Author: Joanne Addison
Author: Sharon James McGee
Abstract: In Writing and School Reform, Joanne Addison and Sharon James McGee respond to a testing and accountability movement that has imposed increasingly stronger measures of control over our classrooms, shifted teaching away from best practices, and eroded teacher and student agency. Drawing on historical and empirical research, Writing and School Reform details the origins of the accountability movement, explores its emerging effects on the teaching of writing, and charts a path forward that reasserts the agency of teachers and researchers in the field.
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
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Writing at the State U: Instruction and Administration at 106 Comprehensive Universities

Author: Emily J. Isaacs
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Writing at the State U presents a comprehensive, empirical examination of writing programs at 106 universities. Rather than using open survey calls and self-reporting, Emily Isaacs uses statistical analysis to show the extent to which established principles of writing instruction and administration have been implemented at state comprehensive universities, the ways in which writing at those institutions has differed from writing at other institutions over time, and how state institutions have responded to major scholarly debates concerning first-year composition and writing program administration. Unique in its wide scope and methodology, Writing at the State U sheds much-needed light on the true state of the writing discipline at state universities and demonstrates the advantages of more frequent and rigorous quantitative studies of the field.

Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Writing in Online Courses: How the Online Environment Shapes Writing Practices

Editor: Phoebe Jackson
Editor: Christopher Weaver
Abstract: For scholars interested in the intersection of writing and online instruction, Writing in Online Courses: How the Online Environment Shapes Writing and Practice examines both the theoretical and practical implications of writing in online courses. The essays in this collection reflect upon what the authors have learned about the synergistic way that writing helps to shape online instruction and how online instruction helps to shape the writing process.
Publisher: Myers Education Press
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Writing Pathways to Student Success

Editor: Lillian Craton
Author: Renee Love
Author: Sean Barnette
Abstract: Teachers of first-year composition courses do essential work. Teaching argumentation and conventions of university-level writing; demystifying citation and punctuation; promoting reading comprehension and analysis. Yet such skills, as important as they are, do not reflect the full scope of our discipline. Some of the best learning in composition coursework relates to students' growth as successful individuals able to live and write in a complex world. Composition instructors demand civil discourse and respect for diversity. They coach students in time management and the creative process. They build up confidence, break down learning obstacles, and promote self-examination. The essays found in Writing Pathways for Student Success, written by and for instructors of college writing, examine life lessons that both students and instructors learn from first-year composition courses.
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
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You Can't Be What You Can't See: The Power of Opportunity to Change Young Lives

Author: Milbrey W. McLaughlin
Abstract: You Can’t Be What You Can’t See presents a rare longitudinal account of the benefits of a high-quality, out-of-school program on the life trajectories of hundreds of poor, African American youth who grew up in Chicago’s notorious Cabrini-Green housing project in the 1980s and early ’90s.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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