Books For Review

To request an book for review:

  • Register as an author with this journal.
  • Log in as an author.
  • Click on the request link that corresponds to the object of interest.


  • Filter by:
  • Sort by:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Systems for Instructional Improvement: Creating Coherence from the Classroom to the District Office

Author: Paul Cobb
Author: Kara Jackson
Author: Erin Henrick
Author: Thomas M. Smith
Abstract: In Systems for Instructional Improvement, Paul Cobb and his colleagues draw on their extensive research to propose a series of specific, empirically grounded recommendations that together constitute a theory of action for advancing instruction at scale. The authors outline the elements of a coherent instructional system; describe productive practices for school leaders in supporting teachers’ growth; and discuss the role of district leaders in developing school-level capacity for instructional improvement.
 
Based on the findings of an eight-year research-practice partnership with four large urban districts investigating their efforts to enhance middle school math instruction, the authors seek to bridge the gap between the literature on improving teaching and learning and the literature on policy and leadership. They look at the entire education system and make recommendations on improvement efforts with a focus on student learning and teachers’ instructional vision. In particular, the authors offer insights on the interplay among various supports for teacher learning, including pullout professional development, coaching, collaborative inquiry, the most instructionally productive uses of principals’ time, and the tensions that tend to emerge at the district level. They provide a guide for district-level leaders in organizing their work to support significant teacher learning.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Taking Control of Writing Your Thesis: A Guide to Get You to the End

Author: Kay Guccione
Author: Jerry Wellington
Abstract:

Taking Control of Writing Your Thesis offers you a clear account of the how, what, why and who of working together so that you can produce, finish and submit a successful thesis. Guccione is a Thesis Coach and Thesis Mentoring Programme Designer and is currently researching the barriers to thesis completion; Wellington has supervised and examined numerous dissertations at MA and doctoral level. They draw on these experiences throughout in providing you with expert guidance for your thesis, informed by real student testimonies and with 'Points to Ponder' and a wealth of online resources to support you along the way.

Guccione and Wellington show that planning, writing and support for thesis writers is a collaborative venture but also one which you can take ownership of and manage. They show that there are ways to become more connected to what and who you need, and explore the collegial and peer-support structures that are there to be utilised. They situate the student within an educational context viewing them not as the lone researcher able or not able, skilled or unskilled, but as the navigator of the writing process. The authors draw on their experience to provide ways of thinking, and tools for empowering students to feel more in control of the practices of writing about research.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Talent Development as a Framework for Gifted Education: Implications for Best Practices and Applications in Schools

Author: Paula Olszewski-Kubilius
Author: Rena Subotnik
Abstract: "Talent development" is a phrase often used in reference to the education of gifted children. Recently, it has been presented by researchers to refer to a specific approach to the delivery of gifted education services. Much of this discussion has been at the conceptual level, and there is a need for translation of the model into concrete practices and examples that enable educators to better serve gifted children within their schools and districts. This book addresses that need. The research behind the talent development framework is briefly reviewed, followed by practical implications for identification and program design within domains of talent. To illustrate successful approaches, the authors draw on examples from academic domains, as well as performance fields such as sports and music, to help teachers, school administrators, school psychologists, social workers and counselors, graduate students, and parents develop gifted students' talents.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Talented Young Men Overcoming Tough Times: An Exploration of Resilience

Author: Thomas P. Hebert
Abstract: Talented Young Men Overcoming Tough Times features the life stories of five gifted, high-achieving young men who overcame serious adversity in their lives. Their stories, captured through qualitative interviews, help us to better understand the factors that shaped their resilience and enabled them to overcome difficult challenges, including homelessness, poverty, bullying, dysfunctional families, and abuse. The five young men succeeded in overcoming their difficult circumstances in adolescence and met strong success in higher education, obtaining advanced graduate degrees and moving on to productive professional careers. 
Publisher: Prufrock
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teacher Preparation at the Intersection of Race and Poverty in Today's Schools

Editor: Patrick M. Jenlink
Abstract: Teacher Preparation at the Intersection of Race and Poverty in Today's Schools introduces the reader to a collection of thoughtful works by authors that represent current thinking about teacher preparation. Importantly, the book is divided into two primary sections, the first being four chapters that offer understanding of the depth and breadth of the intersection of race and poverty as it relates to teaching and teacher preparation. The second section presents Dialogues of Teacher Education focused on “Meeting the Challenge of Race and Poverty in Our Schools: The Role of Teacher Education” with eight contributing authors who reflect on and give voice to meeting the challenge. 
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education

Editor: Pam Grossman
Abstract:

In Teaching Core Practices in Teacher Education, Pam Grossman and colleagues advocate an approach to practice-based teacher education that identifies “core practices” of teaching and supports novice teachers in learning how to enact them competently. Examples of core practices include facilitating whole-class discussion, eliciting student thinking, and maintaining classroom norms. The contributors argue that teacher education needs to do more to help teachers master these professional skills, rather than simply emphasizing content knowledge. They  outlines a series of pedagogies that teacher educators can use to help preservice students develop these teaching skills. Pedagogies include representations of practice (ways to show what this skill looks like and break it down into its component parts) and approximations of practice (the ways preservice teachers can try these skills out as they learn). Vignettes throughout the book illustrate how core practices can be incorporated into the teacher education curriculum. Drawing on the work of a consortium of teacher educators from 13 universities devoted to describing and enacting pedagogies to help novice teachers develop these core practices in support of ambitious and equitable instruction, the authors aim to support teacher educator learning across institutions, content domains, and grade levels. The book also addresses efforts to support teacher learning outside formal teacher education programs.

Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching Empathy: Strategies for Building Emotional Intelligence in Today's Students

Author: Suzanna E. Henshon
Abstract:

As classrooms become more diverse, it is increasingly important that students learn how to empathize with others who may come from very different backgrounds. Teaching Empathy:

  • Guides teachers to create and maintain classrooms in which students are sensitive to the needs of others.
  • Shows teachers how to create an environment of empathy and understanding for 21st-century students.
  • Uses relevant research and ideas for classroom activities.
  • Offers advice for working with diverse students.
  • Discusses cognitive, emotional, and compassionate empathy, as well as emotional intelligence.
  • Considers the long-term global impact of cultivating empathy in students.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching for Educational Equity: Case Studies for Professional Development and Principal Preparation (Volume 2)

Author: Jane A. Beese
Author: Jennifer L. Martin
Abstract: Teachers and school leaders are confronted by various issues pertaining to social justice every day. This volume will help school leaders to handle these issues ethically, and is intended to be used by administrators for the professional development of teachers, teacher leaders, and aspiring principals. This volume can be also be used in the higher education classroom in order to prepare current and aspiring administrators to lead for social justice. This volume utilizes the case study approach, which has been found to “sharpen problem-solving skills and to improve the ability to think and reason rigorously” (Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2013). 
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching for Purpose Preparing Students for Lives of Meaning

Author: Heather Malin
Abstract: In Teaching for Purpose, Heather Malin explores the idea of purpose as the purpose of education and shows how educators can prepare youth to live intentional, fulfilling lives. The book highlights the important role that purpose—defined as “a future-directed goal that is personally meaningful and aimed at contributing to something larger than the self”—plays in optimal youth development and in motivating students to promote the cognitive and noncognitive skills that teachers want to instill.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching Girls: How Teachers and Parents Can Reach Their Brains and Hearts

Author: Peter Kuriloff
Author: Shannon Andrus
Author: Charlotte Jacobs
Abstract: The authors review the special qualities of lessons that resonate with girls and show how they meet their developmental needs throughout adolescence. They also show how vital it is that such teaching happen within schools that help students learn about the numerous ways that gender affects girls’ development. The authors conclude by detailing how school leaders can create cultures that support this kind of great learning and teaching.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching History and the Changing Nation State: Transnational and Intranational Perspectives

Editor: Robert Guyver
Abstract:

Capitalizing on the current movement in history education to nurture a set of shared methodologies and perspectives, this text looks to break down some of the obstacles to transnational understanding in history, focusing on pedagogy to embed democratic principles of inclusion, inquiry, multiple interpretations and freedom of expression.

Four themes which are influencing the broadening of history education to a globalized community of practice run throughout Teaching History and the Changing Nation State:
· pedagogy, democracy and dialogue
· the nation – politics and transnational dimensions
· landmarks with questions
· shared histories, shared commemorations and re-evaluating past denials

The contributors use the same pedagogical language in a global debate about history teaching and learning to break down barriers to search for shared histories and mutual understanding. They explore contemporary topics, including The Gallipoli Campaign in the WWI, transformative approaches to a school history curriculum and the nature of federation.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching in Context: The Social Side of Education Reform

Editor: Esther Quintero
Abstract: Teaching in Context provides new evidence from a range of leading scholars showing that teachers become more effective when they work in organizations that support them in comprehensive and coordinated ways. The studies featured in the book suggest an alternative approach to enhancing teacher quality: creating conditions and school structures that facilitate the transmission and sharing of knowledge among teachers, allowing teachers to work together effectively, and capitalizing on what we know about how educators learn and improve. The studies also show how social dynamics influence the speed, depth, and success with which any new idea is implemented, and how policies enacted without adequate consideration of their impact on the social fabric of schools can produce unintended negative consequences.
 
Policies aimed at improving teaching should focus on strengthening the organization as a whole so that all teachers are likely to improve. The chapters in this book point to the need to reevaluate current policies for assessing and ensuring teacher effectiveness, and establish the foundation for a more thoughtful, research-informed approach.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching in the Age of Disinformation: Don’t Confuse Me with the Data, My Mind Is Made Up!

Author: Selma Wassermann
Abstract: Teaching in the Age of Disinformation makes a case for the importance of developing students’ intelligent habits of mind so that they become more discriminating consumers of the information that comes at them from the Internet, social media, television and the tabloid press in this “alternate truth” era. Part I sets the stage for the need for an informed citizenry, given the many and varied sources of disinformation that they are exposed to and what the implications are when they are unable to make such distinctions. Part II deals with the specifics of how teachers may develop curriculum activities that call for higher order thinking, within the many and diverse subject areas of elementary and secondary education. Hundreds of examples of curriculum activities are included, as well as suggestions for how teachers use higher order questioning strategies in classroom discussions to enable and promote student thinking. “A pleasure to read,” the book draws on the author’s long and extensive experience in teaching, writing and research with “teaching for thinking,” and offers teachers research-tested ways to incorporate the development of students’ intelligent habits of mind in their daily classroom work.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching outside the box: Beyond the deficit-driven school reforms

Author: Mai Abdul Rahman
Abstract: The book argues that past school failures are instructive. The author identifies the structural and emotional triggers that make it difficult for educators to overcome the social constructs that control the progress of Black students, reproduce inequities, subvert the socio-economic progress of the nation, and threaten the legitimacy of the U.S. public school system. One failure is informative; successive school failures are chock-full of must avoid school policies and instructional practices.
Publisher: Information Age
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America

Author: Ellen C. Carillo
Abstract: Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America shows how postsecondary teachers can engage with the phenomenon of “post-truth.” Drawing on research from the fields of educational and cognitive psychology, human development, philosophy, and education, Ellen C. Carillo demonstrates that teaching critical reading is a strategic and targeted response to the current climate.
Publisher: Utah State University Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching STEM to First Generation College Students: A Guidebook for Faculty & Future Faculty

Author: Gail Horowitz
Abstract: Research shows that students who are the first-generation in their family to attend or complete college are likely to arrive at your classroom not knowing what it takes to be successful. And data shows that more first-generation students are likely to be arriving on your doorstep in the near future. What can you do to help these students be successful?This book can provide you with some research based methods that are quick, easy, and effortless. These are steps that you can take to help first-generation college students succeed without having to change the way you teach.Why put in this effort in the first place? The payoff is truly worth it. 
Publisher: Information Age
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination: Essays Exploring What “Teaching Writing” Means

Author: P. L. Thomas
Abstract: Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination is the culmination of P.L. Thomas’s experiences as both a writer and a teacher of writing reaching into the fourth decade of struggling with both.This volume collects essays that examine the enduring and contemporary questions facing writing teachers, including grammar instruction, authentic practices in high-stakes environments, student choice, citation and plagiarism, the five-paragraph essay, grading, and the intersections of being a writer and teaching writing. Thomas offers concrete classroom experiences drawn from teaching high school ELA, first-year composition, and a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses.
Publisher: Information Age
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

Technology in School Classrooms: How It Can Transform Teaching and Student Learning Today

Editor: James G. Cibulka
Editor: Bruce S. Cooper
Abstract:
This book provides an excellent analysis of whether and how digital technologies can transform teaching and learning in classroom settings. The authors collectively provide a multi-dimensional perspective on how and under what conditions technology can be productively employed by teachers to more effectively meet the challenges presented by a rapidly evolving world.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter

Author: Leonard S. Marcus
Abstract: A favorite childhood book can leave a lasting impression, but as adults we tend to shelve such memories. For fourteen months beginning in June 2013, more than half a million visitors to the New York Public Library viewed an exhibition about the role that children’s books play in world culture and in our lives. After the exhibition closed, attendees clamored for a catalog of The ABC of It as well as for children’s literature historian Leonard S. Marcus’s insightful, wry commentary about the objects on display. Now with this book, a collaboration between the University of Minnesota’s Kerlan Collection of Children’s Literature and Leonard Marcus, the nostalgia and vision of that exhibit can be experienced anywhere. 
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The ADHD Empowerment Guide: Identifying Your Child's Strengths and Unlocking Potential

Author: James W. Forgan
Author: Mary Anne Richey
Abstract: The ADHD Empowerment Guide is different from other parenting ADHD books because it helps parents identify their child's strengths to develop a specific plan to unlock their child's potential. Parents will complete two easy-to-follow questionnaires to identify their child's natural abilities, as well as determine key characteristics in their child that research has shown to help children with ADHD succeed in life. These characteristics include emotional control, integrity, grit, resiliency, resourcefulness, organization, motivation, school fit, support systems, and productive use of technology.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Ambitious Elementary School: Its Conception, Design, and Implications for Educational Equality

Author: Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick
Author: Stephen W. Raudenbush
Author: Lisa Rosen
Abstract: Drawing on an in-depth study of real schools on the South Side of Chicago, Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning. They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers. Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Branding of the American Mind: How Universities Capture, Manage, and Monetize Intellectual Property and Why It Matters

Author: Jacob H. Rooksby
Abstract:

Universities generate an enormous amount of intellectual property, including copyrights, trademarks, patents, Internet domain names, and even trade secrets. Until recently, universities often ceded ownership of this property to the faculty member or student who created or discovered it in the course of their research. Increasingly, though, universities have become protective of this property, claiming it for their own use and licensing it as a revenue source instead of allowing it to remain in the public sphere. Many universities now behave like private corporations, suing to protect trademarked sports logos, patents, and name brands.

Yet how can private rights accumulation and enforcement further the public interest in higher education? What is to be gained and lost as institutions become more guarded and contentious in their orientation toward intellectual property? In this pioneering book, law professor Jacob H. Rooksby uses a mixture of qualitative, quantitative, and legal research methods to grapple with those central questions, exposing and critiquing the industry’s unquestioned and growing embrace of intellectual property from the perspective of research in law, higher education, and the social sciences.

While knowledge creation and dissemination have a long history in higher education, using intellectual property as a vehicle for rights staking and enforcement is a relatively new and, as Rooksby argues, dangerous phenomenon for the sector. The Branding of the American Mindpoints to higher education’s love affair with intellectual property itself, in all its dimensions, including newer forms that are less tied to scholarly output. The result is an unwelcome assault on the public’s interest in higher education.

Presuming no background knowledge of intellectual property, and ending with a call to action,The Branding of the American Mind explores applicable laws, legal regimes, and precedent in plain English, making the book appealing to anyone concerned for the future of higher education.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Caring Child: Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children

Author: Christine Fonseca
Abstract: "The Caring Child: Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children pulls together the latest research from positive psychology to provide parents specific tools to help their children develop healthy empathy and emotional intelligence. Presented in an easy-to-read, conversational style, the book uses a combination of evidence-based strategies, real-world examples, and role-playing scenarios to provide parents with the tools needed to develop these important skills. 
Publisher: Prufrock Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The College Dropout Scandal

Author: David Kipp
Abstract: Kirp relies on vivid, on-the-ground reporting, conversations with campus leaders, faculty and students, as well as cogent overviews of cutting-edge research to identify the institutional reforms--like using big data to quickly identify at-risk students and get them the support they need -- and the behavioral strategies -- from nudges to mindset changes - -that have been proven to work. 

Through engaging stories that shine a light on an underappreciated problem in colleges today, David Kirp's hopeful book will prompt colleges to make student success a top priority and push more students across the finish line, keeping their hopes of achieving the American Dream alive.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Collegiate Athlete at Risk: Strategies for Academic Support and Success

Editor: Morris R. Council, III
Editor: Samuel R. Hodge
Editor: Robert A. Bennett, III
Abstract: The general target audience is college/university practitioners who interface with student-athletes who demonstrate academic and social risk in the realm of athletics.These stakeholders include but are not limited to: academic support staff, student athletes, parents, coaches, faculty/educators, counselors, psychologists, higher education administrators, student affairs professionals, disability services coordinators/personnel, as well as researchers who focus on education leadership, sports, and special education. All of these groups are likely to find this book attractive especially as they work with student-athletes who are at-risk for academic failure. 
Publisher: Information Age
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Courage to Collaborate: The Case for Labor-Management Partnerships in Education

Author: Ken Futernick
Abstract: In The Courage to Collaborate, school turnaround expert Ken Futernick makes the case that collaboration between school management and teacher unions is a necessary condition for educational improvement. The author cites evidence showing that collaboration often leads to increased trust, stronger professional relationships, better policies, better implementation of programs and, ultimately, to better outcomes for students.

Drawing on new research, his own experience, and the experience of dozens of other district and union leaders, Futernick details key features and benefits of labor-management collaboration. He also identifies and addresses several obstacles preventing its widespread adoption, including resistance to change, myths about what collaboration really means, skepticism about unions, lack of technical support, and misguided education policy.

The Courage to Collaborate recommends strategies and tactics for educators, policy makers, and others interested in embracing collaboration over confrontation. Both sides—unions and management—must make changes so that collaboration becomes the norm, rather than the exception, Futernick argues.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:

The Craft of University Teaching

Author: Peter Lindsay
Abstract:

Intended for professors of all academic disciplines who either enjoy teaching or wish to enjoy it more, The Craft of University Teaching is a provocative and accessible book containing practical advice gleaned from the academic literature on pedagogy. In an era of increased bureaucratic oversight, rapidly diminishing budgets, and waves of technological distraction, this volume provokes reflection on matters of pedagogy that are too often taken as settled. In so doing, it seeks to reclaim teaching as the intellectually vibrant and intrinsically rewarding endeavor that it is.

Publisher: University of Toronto Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Crisis of Connection: Roots, Consequences, and Solutions

Editor: Niobe Way
Editor: Alisha Ali
Editor: Carol Gilligan
Editor: Pedro Noguera
Abstract:

Since the beginning of the 21st century, people have become increasingly disconnected from themselves, each other, and the world around them. A “crisis of connection” stemming from growing alienation, social isolation, and fragmentation characterizes modern society. The signs of this “crisis of connection” are everywhere, from decreasing levels of empathy and trust, to burgeoning cases of suicide, depression and loneliness. The astronomical rise in inequality around the world has contributed to the critical nature of this moment. 

To delve into the heart of the crisis, leading researchers and practitioners draw from the science of human connection to tell a five-part story about its roots, consequences, and solutions. In doing so, they reveal how we, in modern society, have been captive to a false story about who we are as human. This false narrative that takes individualism as a universal truth, has contributed to many of the problems that we currently face. The new story now emerging from across the human sciences underscores our social and emotional capacities and needs. The science also reveals the ways in which the privileging of the self over relationships and of individual success over the common good as well as the perpetuation of dehumanizing stereotypes have led to a crisis of connection that is now widespread. Finally, the practitioners in the volume present concrete solutions that show ways we can create a more just and humane world. 

In these divisive times, The Crisis of Connection is an essential resource for bridging the political, religious, identity-based, and ideological gaps among individuals and communities. By exposing the barriers that stand in the way of our human desire to live in connection with ourselves and each other, this book illuminates concrete pathways to enhancing our awareness of our common humanity.

Publisher: NYU Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Critical Advantage: Developing Critical Thinking Skills in School

Author: William T. Gormley
Abstract: In The Critical Advantage, noted scholar and early childhood expert William T. Gormley, Jr. takes a wide-ranging look at the important role of critical thinking in preparing students for college, careers, and civic life.
 
Drawing on research from psychology, philosophy, business, political science, neuroscience, and other disciplines, he offers a contemporary definition of critical thinking and its relationship to other forms of thinking, including creative thinking and problem solving. When defined broadly and taught early, he argues, critical thinking is a “potential cure for some of the biggest problems we face as a nation,” including education deficits, employment deficits, and the recent surge of partisanship in democratic politics. While there are encouraging signs—the Common Core State Standards have drawn attention to the importance of critical thinking—recent efforts have been too narrowly focused on improving textual analysis in high school. Those who might benefit the most from curricula prioritizing critical thinking, including disadvantaged students, are less likely to be represented in courses and other activities that encourage this skill.
 
Gormley argues for prioritizing critical thinking skills in PreK–12. He takes readers into innovative classrooms around the country, including schools in Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, and Virginia, and offers specific recommendations for promoting critical thinking and embedding it across the curriculum.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
key words:
##plugins.generic.objectsForReview.public.coverPage.altText##

The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity

Author: Nadine Burke Harris
Abstract: Dr. Nadine Burke Harris was already known as a crusading physician delivering targeted care to vulnerable children. But it was Diego—a boy who had stopped growing after a sexual trauma—who galvanized her to dig deeper into the connections between toxic stress and the lifelong illnesses she was tracking among so many of her patients and their families. A survey of more than 17,000 adult patients’ “adverse childhood experiences,” or ACEs, like divorce, substance abuse, or neglect, had proved that the higher a person’s ACE score the worse their health—and now led Burke Harris to an astonishing breakthrough. Childhood stress changes our neural systems and lasts a lifetime. 
 
Through storytelling that delivers both scientific insight and moving stories of personal impact, Burke Harris illuminates her journey of discovery, from research labs nationwide to her own pediatric practice in San Francisco’s Bayview-Hunters Point. For anyone who has faced a difficult childhood, or who cares about the millions of children who do, the innovative and acclaimed health interventions outlined in The Deepest Well will represent vitally important hope for change. 
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
key words:
181 - 210 of 274 Items     << < 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>