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Teaching for Educational Equity: Case Studies for Professional Development and Principal Preparation (Volume 2)

Author: Jane A. Beese
Author: Jennifer L. Martin
Abstract: Teachers and school leaders are confronted by various issues pertaining to social justice every day. This volume will help school leaders to handle these issues ethically, and is intended to be used by administrators for the professional development of teachers, teacher leaders, and aspiring principals. This volume can be also be used in the higher education classroom in order to prepare current and aspiring administrators to lead for social justice. This volume utilizes the case study approach, which has been found to “sharpen problem-solving skills and to improve the ability to think and reason rigorously” (Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2013). 
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching for Purpose Preparing Students for Lives of Meaning

Author: Heather Malin
Abstract: In Teaching for Purpose, Heather Malin explores the idea of purpose as the purpose of education and shows how educators can prepare youth to live intentional, fulfilling lives. The book highlights the important role that purpose—defined as “a future-directed goal that is personally meaningful and aimed at contributing to something larger than the self”—plays in optimal youth development and in motivating students to promote the cognitive and noncognitive skills that teachers want to instill.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching History and the Changing Nation State: Transnational and Intranational Perspectives

Editor: Robert Guyver
Abstract:

Capitalizing on the current movement in history education to nurture a set of shared methodologies and perspectives, this text looks to break down some of the obstacles to transnational understanding in history, focusing on pedagogy to embed democratic principles of inclusion, inquiry, multiple interpretations and freedom of expression.

Four themes which are influencing the broadening of history education to a globalized community of practice run throughout Teaching History and the Changing Nation State:
· pedagogy, democracy and dialogue
· the nation – politics and transnational dimensions
· landmarks with questions
· shared histories, shared commemorations and re-evaluating past denials

The contributors use the same pedagogical language in a global debate about history teaching and learning to break down barriers to search for shared histories and mutual understanding. They explore contemporary topics, including The Gallipoli Campaign in the WWI, transformative approaches to a school history curriculum and the nature of federation.

Publisher: Bloomsbury
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Teaching in Context: The Social Side of Education Reform

Editor: Esther Quintero
Abstract: Teaching in Context provides new evidence from a range of leading scholars showing that teachers become more effective when they work in organizations that support them in comprehensive and coordinated ways. The studies featured in the book suggest an alternative approach to enhancing teacher quality: creating conditions and school structures that facilitate the transmission and sharing of knowledge among teachers, allowing teachers to work together effectively, and capitalizing on what we know about how educators learn and improve. The studies also show how social dynamics influence the speed, depth, and success with which any new idea is implemented, and how policies enacted without adequate consideration of their impact on the social fabric of schools can produce unintended negative consequences.
 
Policies aimed at improving teaching should focus on strengthening the organization as a whole so that all teachers are likely to improve. The chapters in this book point to the need to reevaluate current policies for assessing and ensuring teacher effectiveness, and establish the foundation for a more thoughtful, research-informed approach.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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Teaching in the Age of Disinformation: Don’t Confuse Me with the Data, My Mind Is Made Up!

Author: Selma Wassermann
Abstract: Teaching in the Age of Disinformation makes a case for the importance of developing students’ intelligent habits of mind so that they become more discriminating consumers of the information that comes at them from the Internet, social media, television and the tabloid press in this “alternate truth” era. Part I sets the stage for the need for an informed citizenry, given the many and varied sources of disinformation that they are exposed to and what the implications are when they are unable to make such distinctions. Part II deals with the specifics of how teachers may develop curriculum activities that call for higher order thinking, within the many and diverse subject areas of elementary and secondary education. Hundreds of examples of curriculum activities are included, as well as suggestions for how teachers use higher order questioning strategies in classroom discussions to enable and promote student thinking. “A pleasure to read,” the book draws on the author’s long and extensive experience in teaching, writing and research with “teaching for thinking,” and offers teachers research-tested ways to incorporate the development of students’ intelligent habits of mind in their daily classroom work.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Teaching outside the box: Beyond the deficit-driven school reforms

Author: Mai Abdul Rahman
Abstract: The book argues that past school failures are instructive. The author identifies the structural and emotional triggers that make it difficult for educators to overcome the social constructs that control the progress of Black students, reproduce inequities, subvert the socio-economic progress of the nation, and threaten the legitimacy of the U.S. public school system. One failure is informative; successive school failures are chock-full of must avoid school policies and instructional practices.
Publisher: Information Age
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Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America

Author: Ellen C. Carillo
Abstract: Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America shows how postsecondary teachers can engage with the phenomenon of “post-truth.” Drawing on research from the fields of educational and cognitive psychology, human development, philosophy, and education, Ellen C. Carillo demonstrates that teaching critical reading is a strategic and targeted response to the current climate.
Publisher: Utah State University Press
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Teaching STEM to First Generation College Students: A Guidebook for Faculty & Future Faculty

Author: Gail Horowitz
Abstract: Research shows that students who are the first-generation in their family to attend or complete college are likely to arrive at your classroom not knowing what it takes to be successful. And data shows that more first-generation students are likely to be arriving on your doorstep in the near future. What can you do to help these students be successful?This book can provide you with some research based methods that are quick, easy, and effortless. These are steps that you can take to help first-generation college students succeed without having to change the way you teach.Why put in this effort in the first place? The payoff is truly worth it. 
Publisher: Information Age
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Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination: Essays Exploring What “Teaching Writing” Means

Author: P. L. Thomas
Abstract: Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination is the culmination of P.L. Thomas’s experiences as both a writer and a teacher of writing reaching into the fourth decade of struggling with both.This volume collects essays that examine the enduring and contemporary questions facing writing teachers, including grammar instruction, authentic practices in high-stakes environments, student choice, citation and plagiarism, the five-paragraph essay, grading, and the intersections of being a writer and teaching writing. Thomas offers concrete classroom experiences drawn from teaching high school ELA, first-year composition, and a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses.
Publisher: Information Age
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Technology in School Classrooms: How It Can Transform Teaching and Student Learning Today

Editor: James G. Cibulka
Editor: Bruce S. Cooper
Abstract:
This book provides an excellent analysis of whether and how digital technologies can transform teaching and learning in classroom settings. The authors collectively provide a multi-dimensional perspective on how and under what conditions technology can be productively employed by teachers to more effectively meet the challenges presented by a rapidly evolving world.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Technology Segregation: Disrupting Racist Frameworks in Early Childhood Education

Author: Miriam Tager
Abstract: This research, which includes two qualitative studies in the Northeast, reveals that school segregation and technology segregation are one in the same. Utilizing critical race theory, as the theoretical framework, this research finds that young Black children are denied technological access directly affecting their learning trajectories. PTO fundraising and other monetary donations to public schools vary by district and neighborhood and are based on segregation. Therefore, structural racism flourishes within these early childhood programs as black students are excluded from another important content area and practice. This book defines the problem of technology segregation in terms of policy, racial hierarchies, funding, residential segregation, and the digital divide.
Publisher: Lexington Books
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The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter

Author: Leonard S. Marcus
Abstract: A favorite childhood book can leave a lasting impression, but as adults we tend to shelve such memories. For fourteen months beginning in June 2013, more than half a million visitors to the New York Public Library viewed an exhibition about the role that children’s books play in world culture and in our lives. After the exhibition closed, attendees clamored for a catalog of The ABC of It as well as for children’s literature historian Leonard S. Marcus’s insightful, wry commentary about the objects on display. Now with this book, a collaboration between the University of Minnesota’s Kerlan Collection of Children’s Literature and Leonard Marcus, the nostalgia and vision of that exhibit can be experienced anywhere. 
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
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The ADHD Empowerment Guide: Identifying Your Child's Strengths and Unlocking Potential

Author: James W. Forgan
Author: Mary Anne Richey
Abstract: The ADHD Empowerment Guide is different from other parenting ADHD books because it helps parents identify their child's strengths to develop a specific plan to unlock their child's potential. Parents will complete two easy-to-follow questionnaires to identify their child's natural abilities, as well as determine key characteristics in their child that research has shown to help children with ADHD succeed in life. These characteristics include emotional control, integrity, grit, resiliency, resourcefulness, organization, motivation, school fit, support systems, and productive use of technology.
Publisher: Prufrock Press
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The Ambitious Elementary School: Its Conception, Design, and Implications for Educational Equality

Author: Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick
Author: Stephen W. Raudenbush
Author: Lisa Rosen
Abstract: Drawing on an in-depth study of real schools on the South Side of Chicago, Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning. They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers. Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
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The Branding of the American Mind: How Universities Capture, Manage, and Monetize Intellectual Property and Why It Matters

Author: Jacob H. Rooksby
Abstract:

Universities generate an enormous amount of intellectual property, including copyrights, trademarks, patents, Internet domain names, and even trade secrets. Until recently, universities often ceded ownership of this property to the faculty member or student who created or discovered it in the course of their research. Increasingly, though, universities have become protective of this property, claiming it for their own use and licensing it as a revenue source instead of allowing it to remain in the public sphere. Many universities now behave like private corporations, suing to protect trademarked sports logos, patents, and name brands.

Yet how can private rights accumulation and enforcement further the public interest in higher education? What is to be gained and lost as institutions become more guarded and contentious in their orientation toward intellectual property? In this pioneering book, law professor Jacob H. Rooksby uses a mixture of qualitative, quantitative, and legal research methods to grapple with those central questions, exposing and critiquing the industry’s unquestioned and growing embrace of intellectual property from the perspective of research in law, higher education, and the social sciences.

While knowledge creation and dissemination have a long history in higher education, using intellectual property as a vehicle for rights staking and enforcement is a relatively new and, as Rooksby argues, dangerous phenomenon for the sector. The Branding of the American Mindpoints to higher education’s love affair with intellectual property itself, in all its dimensions, including newer forms that are less tied to scholarly output. The result is an unwelcome assault on the public’s interest in higher education.

Presuming no background knowledge of intellectual property, and ending with a call to action,The Branding of the American Mind explores applicable laws, legal regimes, and precedent in plain English, making the book appealing to anyone concerned for the future of higher education.

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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The Brave Educator: Honest Conversations about Navigating Race in the Classroom

Author: Krystle Coburn
Abstract: The Brave Educator equips you with accessible and refreshingly useful tools for real conversations about race that prepare students for the world beyond the school walls. More than a toolkit, this book is a personal conversation exploring the journey from being stuck in the belief that we should already know how to lead conversations about race to learning how to actually have the conversation. It’s companionship for educators, leaders, and teachers facing overwhelming daily responsibilities and searching for open-hearted support. Inside you’ll find a flexible road map to help carve a path through difficult conversations in your classroom, plus question prompts, resource lists, and crucial tips to help you avoid common pitfalls. The grounded perspective and real-world examples in these pages will help you feel less alone as you move from tentative to prepared.
Publisher: Routledge
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The Caring Child: Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children

Author: Christine Fonseca
Abstract: "The Caring Child: Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children pulls together the latest research from positive psychology to provide parents specific tools to help their children develop healthy empathy and emotional intelligence. Presented in an easy-to-read, conversational style, the book uses a combination of evidence-based strategies, real-world examples, and role-playing scenarios to provide parents with the tools needed to develop these important skills. 
Publisher: Prufrock Press
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The Collegiate Athlete at Risk: Strategies for Academic Support and Success

Editor: Morris R. Council, III
Editor: Samuel R. Hodge
Editor: Robert A. Bennett, III
Abstract: The general target audience is college/university practitioners who interface with student-athletes who demonstrate academic and social risk in the realm of athletics.These stakeholders include but are not limited to: academic support staff, student athletes, parents, coaches, faculty/educators, counselors, psychologists, higher education administrators, student affairs professionals, disability services coordinators/personnel, as well as researchers who focus on education leadership, sports, and special education. All of these groups are likely to find this book attractive especially as they work with student-athletes who are at-risk for academic failure. 
Publisher: Information Age
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The Courage to Collaborate: The Case for Labor-Management Partnerships in Education

Author: Ken Futernick
Abstract: In The Courage to Collaborate, school turnaround expert Ken Futernick makes the case that collaboration between school management and teacher unions is a necessary condition for educational improvement. The author cites evidence showing that collaboration often leads to increased trust, stronger professional relationships, better policies, better implementation of programs and, ultimately, to better outcomes for students.

Drawing on new research, his own experience, and the experience of dozens of other district and union leaders, Futernick details key features and benefits of labor-management collaboration. He also identifies and addresses several obstacles preventing its widespread adoption, including resistance to change, myths about what collaboration really means, skepticism about unions, lack of technical support, and misguided education policy.

The Courage to Collaborate recommends strategies and tactics for educators, policy makers, and others interested in embracing collaboration over confrontation. Both sides—unions and management—must make changes so that collaboration becomes the norm, rather than the exception, Futernick argues.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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The Craft of University Teaching

Author: Peter Lindsay
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Intended for professors of all academic disciplines who either enjoy teaching or wish to enjoy it more, The Craft of University Teaching is a provocative and accessible book containing practical advice gleaned from the academic literature on pedagogy. In an era of increased bureaucratic oversight, rapidly diminishing budgets, and waves of technological distraction, this volume provokes reflection on matters of pedagogy that are too often taken as settled. In so doing, it seeks to reclaim teaching as the intellectually vibrant and intrinsically rewarding endeavor that it is.

Publisher: University of Toronto Press
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The Educational Leader's Guide to Improvement Science: Data, Design and Cases for Reflection

Editor: Robert Crow
Editor: Brandi Nicole Hinnant-Crawford
Editor: Dean T. Spaulding
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The Educational Leader’s Guide to Improvement Science: Data, Design and Cases for Reflection is a collection illustrating applied organizational problem-solving using methods of improvement science in educational leadership. Early chapters introduce improvement science and then the reader is led through a logical sequence of inquiry, presented with cases of educational dilemma matched with principles of improvement science and provided examples of research methodology applied in context. Because improvement science research is so quickly becoming a signature pedagogy and core subject area of inquiry in the field of educational leadership, the literature is still scant in its coverage of improvement science models; it is the purpose of this publication to fill the void by providing concrete examples, through case studies, of instances where improvement research methods and analyses can be embedded to enhance and strengthen efforts at organizational improvement. This text concentrates on the elements faculty, students, and administrators need; specific models where improvement science frameworks enhance the reliability and validity of improvement or quality enhancement efforts.

Publisher: Myers Education Press
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The Empowered University: Shared Leadership, Culture Change, and Academic Success

Author: Freeman A. Hrabowski
Abstract: In The Empowered University, Hrabowski and coauthors Philip J. Rous and Peter H. Henderson probe the way senior leaders, administrators, staff, faculty, and students facilitate academic success by cultivating an empowering institutional culture and broad leadership for innovation. They examine how shared leadership enables an empowered campus to tackle tough issues by taking a hard look in the mirror, noting strengths and weaknesses while assessing opportunities and challenges.
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
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The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA): What It Means for Schools, Systems, and States

Editor: Frederick M. Hess
Abstract: This volume provides a thematic and in-depth analysis of the central provisions of this landmark legislation, presenting a range of perspectives. The contributors—leading researchers, policy analysts, and journalists—explore the conflicts and compromises that shaped the emerging law, outline its core provisions, and trace its implications for urban districts, states, and the federal government. Complementing these descriptions are chapters presenting opposing viewpoints on the law’s merits and its ramifications for future reform efforts.
 
Enacted in December 2015, ESSA represents a major shift of the federal role in education, and its provisions touch on almost every aspect of education policy. Yet it arrived in something of a whirlwind, and scholars, advocates, and policy makers are struggling to make sense of this new act. By bringing together leading thinkers to make sense of this important law, The Every Student Succeeds Act provides a solid foundation for scholars, advocates, and policy makers as they begin to navigate a new era in education policy.
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
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The Family Link to Education: The Road to Personal and Professional Success

Author: Rex A. Holiday
Author: Steve Sonntag
Abstract: The Family Link to Education: The Road to Personal and Professional Success is a source of information that is current and relevant for families, educators and communities that want to provide the best possible opportunities for the up and coming generations. Beginning with the family, the book gets right at the root of how the future leaders, entrepreneurs, and educators of our local, national and worldwide communities are molded by early childhood influences. The book offers many suggestions to those who (by right or circumstance) have dibs on the earliest intellectual development of children.
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
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The First 100 Days in the Main Office: Transforming A School Culture

Author: Alan C. Jones
Abstract: This book presents a series of cultural situations that could occur within the first 100 days of a school year: responding to entrenched vocabularies and behaviors, addressing professional and instructional bad habits, enacting alternative teaching scripts, leveraging a policy blindside, redefining the goals and practices of teams, and implementing outside-the-box programs. Each cultural situation offers a new school leader the opportunity to redefine the goals, values, and practices of an entrenched school culture—the Central High way. Administrators reading the title of this book may view 100 days as an arbitrary number picked out of administrative thin air. I argue that disrupting and replacing organizational and instructional routines is a race against time. Every school day that goes by without some sign of creative destruction is one more day that comfortable organizational and instructional routines live on in main offices and classrooms. For the question: “What would you do in the first day in your new office to change your school’s culture?” the most common responses involve reviewing district documents, touring facilities, meeting staff, listening to stakeholders and managing systems. School leaders populate their responses with the current jargon of school reform: learning communities, data mining, standards-based curriculum, differentiated learning, common core standards, formative assessment, race to the top, continuous improvement, etc. While these responses encompass reasonable behaviors on the first day in the main office, not one of these actions possesses the capacity to connect educational values expressed in school mission statements—why are we here—to daily organizational and instructional routines. Each activity gives the appearance of leading, but produces no connections between beliefs, values, and practices. Although none of these responses would make or break a school culture, they do represent a pattern of thinking and behaving that holds out little possibility of fundamentally changing a school’s culture.
Publisher: Information Age
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The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Policies of Development

Author: Kathryn Moeller
Abstract: Drawing on more than a decade of research in the United States and Brazil, this book focuses on how the philanthropic, social responsibility, and business practices of various corporations use a logic of development that positions girls and women as instruments of poverty alleviation and new frontiers for capitalist accumulation. Using the Girl Effect, the philanthropic brand of Nike, Inc., as a central case study, the book examines how these corporations seek to address the problems of gendered poverty and inequality, yet do so using an instrumental logic that shifts the burden of development onto girls and women without transforming the structural conditions that produce poverty. 
Publisher: University of California Press
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The Growing Out-of-School Time Field: Past, Present, and Future

Editor: Helen Janc Malone
Editor: Tara Donahue
Abstract: Leading OST experts explore latest knowledge, intentionally bridging research and practice, and propose new areas of inquiry within each of the following six sections: OST as a vehicle for young people’s development; socio-cultural dimensions of OST; professional development within OST; research- and evaluation-informed field; OST advocacy; and future directions for the OST field. The OST field has grown considerably over the last two decades. Today, we have the frameworks, practice- and research-based knowledge and tools, and burgeoning paths to advance the field across multiple dimensions: demographic, stakeholder groups, contexts, systems and sectors, and disciplines. The hallmark of the OST field has been the ability to remain agile and adaptable to change in a way that complements the field and supports all children and young people in diverse ways. This anthology is designed to be a platform for research-practice discussions and future directions that could further grow, sustain, and improve the field. We hope this book inspires both reflections and conversations on the OST field.
Publisher: Information Age
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The Impoverishment of the American College Student

Author: James V. Koch
Abstract: Higher education funding and tuition and fee inflation are complicated matters that very few people understand well. The Impoverishment of the American College Student clarifies the central issues and provides plentiful data to support its key points. It is a must-read for anyone who believes that maintaining access to and the affordability of public colleges are vitally important to our society's future.
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
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The Intellectual Properties of Learning: A Prehistory from Saint Jerome to John Locke

Author: John Willinsky
Abstract: Providing a sweeping millennium-plus history of the learned book in the West, John Willinsky puts current debates over intellectual property into context, asking what it is about learning that helped to create the concept even as it gave the products of knowledge a different legal and economic standing than other sorts of property.
 
Willinsky begins with Saint Jerome in the fifth century, then traces the evolution of reading, writing, and editing practices in monasteries, schools, universities, and among independent scholars through the medieval period and into the Renaissance. He delves into the influx of Islamic learning and the rediscovery of classical texts, the dissolution of the monasteries, and the founding of the Bodleian Library before finally arriving at John Locke, whose influential lobbying helped bring about the first copyright law, the Statute of Anne of 1710. Willinsky’s bravura tour through this history shows that learning gave rise to our idea of intellectual property while remaining distinct from, if not wholly uncompromised by, the commercial economy that this concept inspired, making it clear that today’s push for marketable intellectual property threatens the very nature of the quest for learning on which it rests.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
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The Last Negroes at Harvard: The Class of 1963 and the 18 Young Men Who Changed Harvard Forever

Author: Kent Garrett
Abstract: In the fall of 1959, Harvard recruited an unprecedented eighteen “Negro” boys as an early form of affirmative action. Four years later they would graduate as African Americans. Some fifty years later, one of these trailblazing Harvard grads, Kent Garrett, would begin to reconnect with his classmates and explore their vastly different backgrounds, lives, and what their time at Harvard meant.
Publisher: Hougthon Mifflin Harcourt
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